Posts Tagged With: Winnie

Don’t Starve

In a recent playthrough, I got bored and set an entire forest on fire.

In a recent playthrough, I got bored and set an entire forest on fire.

In yesterday’s Sibset post I made a brief mention of the game Don’t Starve, and it occurred to me not long after hitting publish that the names of the playable characters were worth a mention. I picked up a copy of Don’t Starve during it’s beta release on Steam (i.e. before it’s official release), and have been a big fan of the game ever since.

At it’s heart, it’s a survival game. You’re effectively plopped down in a world by the antagonist Maxwell and the aim is to survive for as long as possible. The three things you need to keep up is your characters health, hunger and sanity. Whilst you’re busy trying to collect fire wood, there are also many enemies out there attempting to kill you.

As for the playable characters, they all possess a W- name. You start out with Wilson and gradually unlock other characters as the game progresses.

Wilson

A gentleman scientist and the first playable character. His special ability is that of growing a magnificent beard. No, really. The name Wilson means son of William and ranked at #692 in 2013.

Willow

The second playable character, who you can see me playing as above. Willow’s special ability is that of spontaneously (or purposefully) creating fire. Willow is a tree name, the name coming from Old English and means to twist, which itself came from Latin, meaning vine. She ranked at #54 in 2013.

Wendy

The Wendy character is haunted by her dead sister Abigail, whom Wendy can summon as almost a sidekick when fighting mobs. I knew that I’d covered this name before, and was somewhat alarmed to discover that my 3 Long Forms of Wendy post is now 3 years old. Huh. Time flies.

The origins of the name Wendy are often given as being  penned by J.M.Barrie when he first wrote Peter Pan. It also has roots as a nickname of the Welsh name Gwendolen, which means fair, blessed or white, but it was when Barrie used the name that it really entered the public conscious. She ranked at #1774 in 2013.

Wolfgang

The strongest character in the game, Wolfgang bears a Germanic name, meaning path of the wolf. Only 3 babies were given the name in 2013.

Wes

This character is effectively the hard setting for the game, with health, sanity and hunger all decaying much faster for him. The name Wes is the short form of Wesley, a name which means west meadow in Old English. Wes doesn’t rank, but Wesley does – at #655.

Wigfrid

This character is an actress dressed up as a viking. She’s a tough cookie, and is spawned in the game with armour. Her name derives from Old High German, and means peaceful warrior. Predictably, the name doesn’t rank.

via the Don't Starve wikia

via the Don’t Starve wikia

via the Don't Starve wikia

via the Don’t Starve wikia

Woodie

This character beings the game with Lucy the Axe in his inventory, and is a Canadian lumberjack. Woodie is either a nickname for Woodrow, or simply derived from the word wood. The name Woodie does not rank, but Woody does (no doubt with a little help from Toy Story) – at #464.

Webber

This character is a boy who was at some point eaten by a spider, but lives on. His name is therefore a reference to this somewhat bizarre relationship. The name Webber is a surname, and does not rank.

Waverly

This witch character, like all those below, can only be modded in game. Her name is of Old English origin, meaning quaking aspen. I was rather surprised to discover that the name does not rank in England&Wales.

Winnie

This name comes as a nickname of Winifred, and is notably the name of beloved bear-character Winnie the Pooh. She ranked at #925 in 2013.

Wallace

This name started out as a Scottish and English surname, coming from Norman French origins and meaning Welsh/foreigner. The most famed bearer of the name is Sir William Wallace, a Scottish hero whom lead a rebellion against the English in the 13th century. Unsurprising, the name was only given to 4 boys born in England&Wales in 2013.

Wilton

This name was also originally a surname of Old English origins, meaning town on the River Wylye. The name doesn’t rank.

Wilbur

Our last character bears another surname turned first name. This one is also of English origins, and comes from the Middle English nickname Wildbor, meaning wild boar; he ranked at #730.

Categories: Video Game Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Spot of the Week: Behind the Scenes Olympic Names

I visited my Grandma this morning and from the sounds of it, she appears to be drowning in a phenomenal pea harvest from Grandad’s allotment.  I’m sure there’s a post in that, but what remains unsolved.

Suffice to say, they’ve been almost literally throwing their harvest at their friends from the village these past weeks because they don’t want to be stuck eating peas every day for the next 8 years of their lives. My Grandma randomly mentioned a couple of these friends which the peas had been offloaded onto, and predictably, there was a lot of old-school nicknames going on: Dick, Charlie and Winnie were some of the few mentioned. Have I yet mentioned that my Grandma has a painter friend with the name Mim?

The interesting thing about Mim is that she’s been campaigning to the council about changing the name of the road she lives on of all things.

Whilst at the Olympic Stadium on Saturday, I was treated to a flowchart showing who’s who in the running of events services at the Stadium and I can report that the top lady has the surname Wrenn. Double n, and I rather liked it. She’s from the States I believe, not that it really means anything much. The guy who is top man at the Stadium is called Charles ‘Charlie’.

This week’s picture comes courtesy of yummy chocolatiers Thorntons and my Nana who bought it. Who would think to NAME a chocolate bear Bernie??

Thank you Nana!

…because one photo is never enough

Categories: Spot of the Week | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Show Your Spots: Bear Names

Revamped 2007 onwards Pudsey Bear, from bbc.co.uk

Pudsey Bear has taken over BBC1 for the night, and that means no Have I Got News For You my weekly highlight. Many people have been going around all day wearing year bear ears and potentially even wearing spotty clothing as my sister’s school did. I don’t think the people of Britain go as crazy in dressing-up as they do for the biannual Red Nose Day appeal.

The name Pudsey is a fascinating one. There is a town named Pudsey in West Yorkshire, and this is where Pudsey Bear got his name. Pudsey is also well-known for its wool manufacture, and, from the 19th century, Cricket. Many England cricketeers, such as Sir Len Hutton, Matthew Hoggard and Herbert Sutcliffe all learned to play cricket in Pudsey. Sadly, Pudsey is also known for being one of the most polluted areas in the UK during the Industrial Revolution. There is the joke that Pigeons flew backwards in Pudsey to avoid getting soot in their eyes as the wind from industrial towns Leeds and Bradford blew thick soot into Pudsey.

As for the origins of Pudsey, it derives from the Old English name Pudoc, perhaps a diminuative of Puda, meaning Puduc’s island or river land. In 2009, a female bear by the name Blush joined Pudsey as a secondary mascot for the appeal, but Pudsey remains as the focal point for the day.

The next bear I immediately think of is Sooty, who first hit British sceens in the 50s on The Sooty Show, although I grew up with it’s successor, Sooty&co. A fellow bear, or panda bear, named Soo accompanies him in his various shows, and of course, Sooty’s cousin Scampi also featured.

Another blast from the past is The Jungle Book. Fun fact: Rudyard Kipling and I share the same birthday (but not the same year of birth, clearly) and The Jungle Book is more or less 100 years older than I (we’re talking the original publication, not the 60s Disney film). Baloo is a sloth bear from the book and the singer of the well-known tune ‘The Bare Necessities’.

I also confess to loving the name Rupert, not just because of the loveable bear who goes by the same name. Some say this is an issue for them, but he is an endearing character in my mind. The name Rupert is a German form of Robert, which means bright fame. Bear wuold also make for an unexpected nickname for Robert. Other famous cartoon bears include Winnie the Pooh, who was reportedly named after a real-life bear named Winnipeg, and our final bear: Paddington. Generally speaking, Winnie would be taking as a short form for the female name Winifred, but may also be considered for the more gender-neutral Winslow and Winter.

Moving slightly away from bears, one can’t ignore the recycling-nuts that are The Wombles. I grew up with them and I did believe them to be a species of bears named Wombles for pretty much the entirety of my childhood. My favourite character was called Orinoco and the one whose name has always catched my imagination was Tobermory.

The last name to consider is Teddy, as in Teddy Bear. Mostly given as a nickname for Theodore, I’ve been considering alternatives of late:

  • Albert
  • Bertram
  • Alfred
  • Dexter
  • Frederick
  • Edward/Edmund/Edgar (pretty much any Ed name)
  • Sebastien
  • Theophilius

I’m also lead to believe that there’s a character called Humphrey Bear in Australia, whilst America has Yogi Bear, who goes out with another bear named Cindy.

To finish, there are a few possible names to consider which either means bear or have a bear-related meaning:

  • Arthur (disputed)
  • Björn
  • Dov
  • Ursula
Categories: Boy Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.