Posts Tagged With: Ray

Sibset of the Week: The Joneses

Sophie Ellise-Bextor and Richard Jones, from digitalspy.co.uk

Sophie Ellise-Bextor and Richard Jones, from digitalspy.co.uk

This has to be one of my favourite celebrity sibsets, almost certainly. I’m not sure why it is that this particular one has always stood out to me, but you can imagine how excited I was when I found out early last year that a third child was to be added to the clan. And I was right to be so, with another handsomely named son welcomed in April 2012.

The parents are both in the music industry: Sophie Ellis-Bextor and Richard Jones.

The former is a favourite artist of my fathers, and perhaps her best known track being Murder on the Dancefloor which reached the #2 spot in the UK Singles chart back when it was released in 2001 (scarily for me, that’s over 10 years ago now and before my youngest sibling was even born). As for Richard Jones, he’s the bassist for British band The Feeling, and for the international readers it’s worth noting he made an appearance in the music mash-up that was the closing ceremony for the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Their family of five include three sons:

Sonny (b. 2004)

Kit Valentine (b. 2009)

Ray Holiday (b. 2012)

Categories: Sibset of the Week | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

Names Like George

I think the name George is fantastic, and many here in England&Wales seem to be on my wavelength, as he ranked at #12 in 2011.

So of course, it seems apt to put together a list of similar-ish names, should you not be enthralled by the idea of using a popular name. The majority of the names on the list fit into the old-timey-esque one syllable category.

Fitz

Once upon a time the nickname for names such as Fitzroy, this name has been used by itself since the 19th century. It derives from Old French, and means son.

Floyd

A relatively common surname, turned first name. The name itself derives from Lloyd: the slightly altered English version of Welsh name Llwyd which means grey.

Fred

Originally a short form of Frederick, but also of Alfred, Wilfred etc.

Fritz

A nickname for Friedrich, the German form of Frederick. During the First World War it came into use as slang for German soliders, just as the British soldiers came to be nicknamed Tommy.

Gage

More usually an English surname, it derives from Old French and means fixed measure. I remember being asked about gages in my driving test.

Gale

Another adoption of a surname as a first name, with Gale first being used as a first name circa the 18th century. The name derives form Old English and means light, pleasant, merry. It could also have links to Norman French word gaoile, which means gaol (or jail).

Gray/ Grey

Two spellings for the colour which is a mix of white and black.

Gregg

The name Gregg is usually taken as a short form of Gregory: the English form of the Latin name Gregorius, which means to watch.

Mal

Short form of Malcolm, and indeed the name of my very own Grandad.

Ray

Another name once simply a nickname, Ray has been used independently since around the 19th century. For me, this name is wonderful, not least because someone commented that I was a little ray of sunshine only the other day.

 

Categories: Alternative Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Finding Nemo

Marlin & Dory, from blogger.com

I caught wind of news today that Finding Nemo is set to have a sequel, and I almost jumped for joy. The original was released in 2003 when I was maybe 9 or 10 and it was a staple viewing experience at my primary school for a ‘fun’ lesson at the end of term time. That said, with lessons only 60 minutes long, this meant that we never got to see Marlin actually find Nemo. It was sort of like an anti-climax really.

I loved the film, and it’s great to hear that when it was released it was one of the highest grossing G-rated films of all time until Toy Story 3 was released. It’s also currently the 5th highest grossing animated film of all time.

The names in the films are a delightful mix of sea-inspired names and old fashioned retro names. What’s not to love?

NEMO. The title character who is captured by a scuba diver early on in the film. His name sounds cool and retro, but the meaning of the name? Not so cool – Nemo comes from Latin and means nobody. Also, if you were to spell this name backwards, you’d get omen. However, he does possess that oh-so-cool o- ending.

MARLIN. The name of the initially overprotective father of Nemo. This name most likely comes from Merlin, which is the English form of the name Myrddin and means sea fort. It first came into use circa the Middle Ages as a surname, and as a first name in the 16th century. As well as the clownfish bearing the name, it has also been used for a large fish, also known as a spearfish. Aside from the fishy associations, it’s also the name of a type of bird sometimes also referred to as a godwit.

DORY. The companion of Marlin who helps him search for Nemo. Her name is a short form of names beginning with Dor- which include Dora, Dorcas, Doreen, Doris and Dorothy. This is a name I’ve seen a few babies born to in the last few months. A notable one is the second daughter of comedian Robert Webb, younger sister of Esme who was born in 2011.

DEB&FLO. The name of one of the fish in the dentist’s fish tank and that of her reflection. The name Deb is usually taken as a short form of the name Deborah, which means bee in Hebrew. Deborah also happens to be one of my many nicknames for my sister Heather. Flo on the other hand can be a short form for any Flo- name, of which you can find a selection in a previous post, here.

JACQUES. Another fish tank alumni, this time a pacific cleaner shrimp. An initial look at the name may have you thinking that he’s the French form of Jack – but he’s not, rather, he’s the French form of Jacob/James; the meaning of all three names is supplanter.

NIGEL. This fuddy-duddy Brit pick  was bestowed on an Australia-based pelican. The name comes from the Latin Nigellus, which links up to Neil – a name that means champion or cloud.

RAY. The name of Nemo’s class teacher, the name Ray started off life as a nickname for either Rachel or Raymond, this name has evolved into a name in it’s own right. There have been a slew of celeb babies recently bestowed the name Ray either in the first or middle name slot, from Brit-boy Ray Holiday, son of Sophie Ellis-Bextor to little Mabel Ray, daughter of Bruce Willis.

BRUCE. Speaking of Bruce, here’s the name of a shark from the film. The name is originally a Scottish surname, which is traditionally said to come from Brix, Normandy. However, there’s little evidence to back this up. This name has in the last century or so has picked up a reputation as being an archetypal name for an Australian man.

PEARL. A new darling in the world of baby names, the character Pearl was an octopus in Nemo’s school class. In ancient times, it was believed that pearls were formed by raindrops falling into open shells floating on the sea’s surface. Sweet, huh?

SHELDON. Another classmate of Nemo’s, this time a seahorse. He’s another surname-turned-first name that means valley with the steep sides.

DARLA. The name of the evil neice of the dentist. Darla is normally taken as a variation of Darlene, a name that was first coined in North America near the end of the 19th century and inspired by the word darling.

CORAL. The name of Nemo’s mother and Marlin’s wife, she died in a particularly harrowing scene for it’s classification* at the beginning of the film, which the delightful BBFC decided to call mild peril. The first time I watched that scene, I was in tears and even back then, I rarely cried at and/or about anything. The name Coral is a personal favourite of mine, and it is a type of sensitive marine environment currently at risk.

*Note on Classifications: here in the UK, classifications for films are awarded by the British Board of Film Classification, or the BBFC. The lowest classification that a film can receive (which Finding Nemo was awarded) is U, which stands for universal. The BBFC definition of the U certificate is:

A ‘U’ film should be suitable for audiences aged 4+. The films should be set within a positive moral framework and should offer reassuring counterbalances to any violence, threat or horror.

Categories: Film Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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