Posts Tagged With: Nigel

Finding Nemo

Marlin & Dory, from blogger.com

I caught wind of news today that Finding Nemo is set to have a sequel, and I almost jumped for joy. The original was released in 2003 when I was maybe 9 or 10 and it was a staple viewing experience at my primary school for a ‘fun’ lesson at the end of term time. That said, with lessons only 60 minutes long, this meant that we never got to see Marlin actually find Nemo. It was sort of like an anti-climax really.

I loved the film, and it’s great to hear that when it was released it was one of the highest grossing G-rated films of all time until Toy Story 3 was released. It’s also currently the 5th highest grossing animated film of all time.

The names in the films are a delightful mix of sea-inspired names and old fashioned retro names. What’s not to love?

NEMO. The title character who is captured by a scuba diver early on in the film. His name sounds cool and retro, but the meaning of the name? Not so cool – Nemo comes from Latin and means nobody. Also, if you were to spell this name backwards, you’d get omen. However, he does possess that oh-so-cool o- ending.

MARLIN. The name of the initially overprotective father of Nemo. This name most likely comes from Merlin, which is the English form of the name Myrddin and means sea fort. It first came into use circa the Middle Ages as a surname, and as a first name in the 16th century. As well as the clownfish bearing the name, it has also been used for a large fish, also known as a spearfish. Aside from the fishy associations, it’s also the name of a type of bird sometimes also referred to as a godwit.

DORY. The companion of Marlin who helps him search for Nemo. Her name is a short form of names beginning with Dor- which include Dora, Dorcas, Doreen, Doris and Dorothy. This is a name I’ve seen a few babies born to in the last few months. A notable one is the second daughter of comedian Robert Webb, younger sister of Esme who was born in 2011.

DEB&FLO. The name of one of the fish in the dentist’s fish tank and that of her reflection. The name Deb is usually taken as a short form of the name Deborah, which means bee in Hebrew. Deborah also happens to be one of my many nicknames for my sister Heather. Flo on the other hand can be a short form for any Flo- name, of which you can find a selection in a previous post, here.

JACQUES. Another fish tank alumni, this time a pacific cleaner shrimp. An initial look at the name may have you thinking that he’s the French form of Jack – but he’s not, rather, he’s the French form of Jacob/James; the meaning of all three names is supplanter.

NIGEL. This fuddy-duddy Brit pick  was bestowed on an Australia-based pelican. The name comes from the Latin Nigellus, which links up to Neil – a name that means champion or cloud.

RAY. The name of Nemo’s class teacher, the name Ray started off life as a nickname for either Rachel or Raymond, this name has evolved into a name in it’s own right. There have been a slew of celeb babies recently bestowed the name Ray either in the first or middle name slot, from Brit-boy Ray Holiday, son of Sophie Ellis-Bextor to little Mabel Ray, daughter of Bruce Willis.

BRUCE. Speaking of Bruce, here’s the name of a shark from the film. The name is originally a Scottish surname, which is traditionally said to come from Brix, Normandy. However, there’s little evidence to back this up. This name has in the last century or so has picked up a reputation as being an archetypal name for an Australian man.

PEARL. A new darling in the world of baby names, the character Pearl was an octopus in Nemo’s school class. In ancient times, it was believed that pearls were formed by raindrops falling into open shells floating on the sea’s surface. Sweet, huh?

SHELDON. Another classmate of Nemo’s, this time a seahorse. He’s another surname-turned-first name that means valley with the steep sides.

DARLA. The name of the evil neice of the dentist. Darla is normally taken as a variation of Darlene, a name that was first coined in North America near the end of the 19th century and inspired by the word darling.

CORAL. The name of Nemo’s mother and Marlin’s wife, she died in a particularly harrowing scene for it’s classification* at the beginning of the film, which the delightful BBFC decided to call mild peril. The first time I watched that scene, I was in tears and even back then, I rarely cried at and/or about anything. The name Coral is a personal favourite of mine, and it is a type of sensitive marine environment currently at risk.

*Note on Classifications: here in the UK, classifications for films are awarded by the British Board of Film Classification, or the BBFC. The lowest classification that a film can receive (which Finding Nemo was awarded) is U, which stands for universal. The BBFC definition of the U certificate is:

A ‘U’ film should be suitable for audiences aged 4+. The films should be set within a positive moral framework and should offer reassuring counterbalances to any violence, threat or horror.

Categories: Film Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Weekend Post: The Name the Advert Took

Claud from the Renault Mégane advert, from carpages.co.uk

I’ve spent all day running up an down a Great Central Railway train giving out gifts with Santa Claus. That means I have now seen a small sample of what names the kind people of the East Midlands are giving to their offspring. Something someone mentioned to me was that they named their 10 week old daughter Nina because there are too many Clover adverts on the TV at the moment – something I never noticed myself. Clover is a brand of margarine here in the UK, and the recent We All Love Clover ad campaign was ripped to shreds by my peers for featuring people getting rather emotional about some margarine:

Their current advertising campaign is about the greatness of being in the middle. Despite this mother’s concerns, I still maintain Clover is a fantastic choice nevertheless. It’s also worth noting that the name of another brand of margarine here is called Flora.

So, we may hate them, but there’s always that occasional gem you need to look out for when it comes the adverts. Whilst the Clover advert doesn’t feature a named character, the product bears a name that a child could. It’s a thin line really between over and under exposure names get from companies desperate to flog their goods.

Therefore, it seems apt to look at a few adverts that have which all heavily feature a named character. Clearly, if Cadbury had named it’s characters, it would’ve easily taken a place on the list for its drumming gorilla and eyebrows adverts:

1. Adam and Jane (BT)

From the BT adverts we have Adam and Jane, alongside Jane’s children from a previous relationship, Joe and Lucy, and their new baby, Alfie. The main characters are acted out by a Kris and an Esther. The adverts have been following them now for several years, charting the development of their relationship and their use of BT services at the same time.

Whilst you may think that both name are reasonably well used, Jane has fallen down in recent years, now sitting below the 1000 mark:

Adam: #39, 2088 births

Jane: #1040, 32 births

Adam is the Hebrew word for man, whilst Jane ultimately comes from the same sources as John, meaning Yahweh is gracious. I still doubt that the BT adverts really have any effect over whether we use the names Adam and Jane any more or less – but the writers appeared to have picked up on current name trends by using Alfie for the newborn.

2. Alexandr (Compare The Market)

Comparethemeerkat.com has never been more popular. Fronted by the rather batty meerkat, Alexandr Orlov, he urges you to go the comparethemarket for cheap car insurance, not comparethemeerkat. Here in England&Wales, you’re more likely to meet an Alexander than a Alexandr:

Alexandr: #4678, 3 births

Alexander: #21, 3025 births

Really, using Alexandr may mean you get simples shouted at your little one, but there are two facts to consider:

  1. The majority of Alexandr’s (with whatever variation) tend to shorten their name.
  2. Alexandr could easily be mistaken for Alexander – it’s your choice to correct them.

3. Nigel (Government Anti-Piracy)

We’ve all been told, knock off Nigel buys knock off DVDs. This one, out of all of these, is probably well remembered given that it came in the form of a catchy song. We all love a catchy tune to hum, and that may be a  hinderance to the name Nigel. That, and the fact that most see Nigel as a middle-aged name. Currently in England&Wales, the name is at:

Nigel: #1344, 18 births

The name Nigel is commonly associated with the Latin word niger, meaning black. It has also been linked with the name Neil, which either means champion or cloud.

4. Pablo (Frank)

I love David Mitchell, who voiced the rather cynical drug awareness advert for Frank: Pablo the Drug Mule dog. Particularly well-known amongst the younger generation, since David Mitchell’s core fan base is as such.

Pablo: #792, 32 births

Pablo is the Spanish form of Paul – which comes from Latin and can either mean small or humble.

5. Claud (Renault Mégane)

This acts as an additional name. In the shortened adverts which were the core ones shown his name is not given, but if you catch the long version, you do find out his name. It follows the pursuits of a frenchman, Claud, as he goes to Gisburn in Lancashire to discover why there is a correlation between fertility and the presence of Renault Méganes in a town. The really long version is quite amusing because of the stick the people of Gisburn give Claud.

‘Money can’t buy you happiness’…’but lack of money certainly causes misery’

Claude: #2629, 7 births (Claud does not rank)

This advert is certainly the least well known of the five, and I’m sure many of you have no idea what I’m talking about. That’s totally fine, even I’m not sure what I’m saying some of the time. My problem with Claud comes from his meaning: he’s a derivation of the Latin name Claudius which means crippled.

Categories: Names from the Box | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Canadian Grand Prix

2010 Podium l-r Maclaren Mercedes Team Principal, Jenson Button, Lewis Hamilton, Fernando Alonso, from f1-gp.info

We’ve got a little longer to wait for the Canadian Grand Prix, since it isn’t until next weekend: 13th June. There’s been a Canadian Grand Prix on the Formula 1 race calender since 1961, bar ’75, ’87 and ’09. That’s a lot of winners, albeit, there have been 8 drivers who have won it multiple times. Some names you may recognise, some you may not, and they range from the distinctive Ayrton, to the not so unusual Peter:

1961 – Peter Ryan

1962 – Masten Gregory

1963/1964 – Pedro Roderígez

1965 – Jim Hall

1966 – Mark Donohue

1967 – John ‘Jack’ Brabham

1968 – Denis ‘Denny’ Hulme

1969/1970 – Jacques ‘Jacky’ Ickx

1971/1972 – John ‘Jackie’ Stewart

1973 – Peter Revson

1974 – Emerson Fittipaldi

1976 – James Hunt

1977 – Jody Scheckter

1978 – Gilles Villeneuve

1979/1980 – Alan Jones

1981 – Jacques Laffite

1982/1984/1991 – Nelson Piquet

1983 – René Arnoux

1985 – Michele Alboreto

1986 – Nigel Mansell

1988/1990 – Ayrton Senna

1989 – Thierry Boutsen

1992 – Gerhard Berger

1993 – Alain Prost

1994/1997/1998/2000/2002/2003/2004 – Michael Schumacher

1995 – Jean Alesi

1996 – Damon Hill

1999 – Mika Hakkinen*

2001 – Ralf Schumacher

2005 – Kimi Raikkonnen*

2006 – Fernando Alonso

2007/2010 – Lewis Hamilton

2008 – Robert Kubica

* There should be umlauts on some of the letters in their names. I can’t do them, apologies.

2011 – Jenson Button

Categories: Sport Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.