Posts Tagged With: Ludo

Loulou…

from rouskadetiolles.fr

Remember how I mentioned the names of John Torode’s kids a few weeks ago in our weekly Sibset post? Well, at the time I claimed his youngest child was called Lulu – and it seems that I was half right. You see, I read an article by the man himself quite by chance a few days ago and he spelled her name Loulou. Loulou! Like Lou, but twice the fun – I’m almost jealous.

This got me thinking, as most things in my life do, about other names which have the quirky characteristic of containing mine. One of my favourite films growing up was The Jungle Book which featured a character called Baloo. Staying with films we have Leeloo from Luc Besson’s The Fifth Element – whose name went on to dominate the French popularity charts in a different guise: Lilou.

Those two examples only scratch the surface. Delving deeper we get to Blue – now famed after Beyonce and Jay-Z gave it to their daughter born in January, whilst Geri Halliwell has a daughter named Bluebell.

Moving over to names starting with Lou, let’s start with royalty. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge recently became owners of a dog named Lupo – whilst actress Hilary Duff welcomed a son named Luca only the other day.

Lupo is an interesting choice and it’s Italian for wolf. A few years ago VW manufactured a car called Lupo, with the last one rolling off the production line in 2005. Interestingly, it was replaced by a car named Fox.

As for Luca, the first critical point to make is that you can legitimately give this name to either your daughter or son – it’s not just a male-only name. Yes, Luca is the Italian and Portuguese version of Luke, but at the same time the name is also the Croatian and Hungarian version of Lucia.

Speaking of Lucia, there’s a new kid on the block with her posse of names and that is the one which started it all off – Lux. From this Latin word for light we get many names, and many offshoots of such names (my favourite, aside from Lucy, is the Welsh Lleulu). Some parents are now opting to return to using simply Lux – and I’ve seen it used on both boys and girls. A comedian by the name of Eddie Perfect recently welcomed a daughter named Lottie Lux, sister for Kitty. Back in June 2011, footballer Andrew Embley welcomed a son named Lux Edward, brother for Autumn Claire.

Both Luke and Lucas are in the Top 100 in England&Wales, but neither Lucian nor Lucius are. It’s worth noting though that the first two names mean man from Lucania, whereas the latter two mean light; aside from them, we also have Lumina which means light.

The opposite of the light is dark, and that’s my strenuous link to Luna – a name which means moon. Sometimes the French will spell this name as Louna, which is a respelling I find myself fond of.

Going back to Eastern Europe, we have Lubomír from the Czech Republic which has the wonderful meaning of peace and light. A name Lubomír always reminds me of the French Ludovic – often shortened to Ludo as Ben Fogle does with his young Ludo – which means famed warrior. From Germany we get Leuthar, or Luther, which means people’s army and this is a name which has passed into English-speaking usage. I’m sure I’m also seen a similar name along the lines of Luthos before.

Now, we’ve mentioned plenty of names beginning with Lou, but there are a few more names which contained a lou sound.

The first I want to mention is Tallulah, a rather fun in sound name and certainly less controversial than the similar name Delilah. Whilst the meaning is uncertain, there are some waterfalls in Georgia named Tallulah. There’s a similar looking Irish name – Talulla – which means princess.

Then we have Mélusine, a name from European folklore. The tale goes that Melusine was a water fairy who transformed into a serpent from the waist below every Saturday.

A male name that merits a mention is Pluto which was until recently the name of a planet; he means wealth. Then we have another popular French name to finish off the list: Elouan. He comes as the name of an obscure saint, recorded in Cornwall as being Elven or Elvan. In Cornish, elven means spark.

All that said, I still believe that the name Lou rocks more than any of these names, personal preference and all.

Categories: Name Themes/Styles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Home

Du pain.

I spent a good deal of my France trip snowed-in, but that didn’t hold me back when it came to spotting some interesting tidbits and names to share. Truth be told, I actually got home last night, but opted to save this post until today.

One of the first names I want to mention is Cocatrix. In between snowstorms I managed to make it to a chateau, in which a mini-artsy area resides. One of the rooms revolves around a creature called the Cocatrix. It’s meant to be an investigation into seeing how much information one needs to throw at someone before they come to believe in an imaginary creature. It was an interesting concept, although I’m still a fan of the whole pretty-paintings style of art. As a name, it’s worthy of thought. Nameberry ran a post this week featuring Cora. In this name she is very much smooshed with another darling-of-the-moment: Beatrix.

Then we have Beyly. Before you all rush to comment on how horrified you all are to see Bailey mutilated in such a way, I ask you to consider the following information: I saw it as someone’s surname, not firstname. Speaking of differing spellings, I also came across a Jheni, a Devid and a Dorine – the latter had a sister named Clémence and both were under 6 years of age.

Moving swiftly to French names, since they’re at their most abundance in France. I managed to meet no less than 4 ladies named Mireille; a Cécile; an Alfre; a Muriel; a Nathalie; a Gilles; an Olivien and a Sandrine. Actually Alfre doesn’t really belong to this set of names since I’m thinking it could be a slight variant of Alfr, which is a name from Norse mythology and means elf. The name Alfie derives from Old English, but too shares the elf meaning. Either way, to me Alfre feels French, but that may be because I’ve spent all week speaking French, where one of the major groups of French verbs are ones ending -re (the other two being -er verbs and -ir verbs): mettre (to put/place), prendre (to take), vivre (to live), suivre (to follow) – to name just a few popular verbs oft heard. There’s an actress called Alfre Ette Woodard.

Not so much a name, but in the time there I came across the French word Pomélo – rather reminds me of Pomona and Pomeline, but it has no relations to apples, rather it’s the French word for a type of grapefruit.

A few more notable names I noticed:

  • Bafétimbi. The name of a French footballer, currently playing for Lyons and the national team.
  • Clovis. Admittedly, the name of the neighbour’s poodle.
  • Edda. The name of a small child’s doll from a supermarket trip.
  • Hannelore. Tween/Teen-aged girl – referred to as Laure.
  • Ludovic. Nicknamed Ludo.
  • Maberly. The name of a lady who served me in a shop.
  • Melhi. Bus driver.
  • Sidse. A half-German female.
  • Thekla. A toddler.
  • Timandra. The name of a lady in the editorial credits for a magazine I read in France. The title of said magazine eludes me.
  • Vicco. 30-something male.
  • Widget. Author of an article I read whilst in France, this was the name given but I could see the argument of it being a nickname.
Categories: Name Spot of the Wek | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Name Spot of the Week: London

The Olympic Rings at St. Pancras station, London. I found out last week that I managed to get two tickets in the 2012 draw 🙂

As you probably know by now, I spent all weekend in London, and it’s quite easily my most favourite place on Earth. But maybe that’s because I always meet the nice people in London. Either way, it made for some interesting name spotting:

Abdullahmani

Avril

Baxter

Bertram

Guinevere

Huw

Jenson

Lynden (Male)

Nell

Opal

Pancras (I travelled through St. Pancras station, one day I will look him up)

Vera

A few days ago I saw Ben Fogle’s announcement that he’d welcomed his second child, a little girl named Iona. Such a lovely name, and she joins elder brother Ludo. Personally, I always think of Ludo Decker, Til Schweiger’s character in the german film: Keinohrhasen, when I hear Ludo.

The aim of my London trip was to go and see All’s Well that Ends Well at Shakespeare’s Globe, and I came away with a love of the name Parolles, a character in the play.

Whilst in London, I made time to finally go through the Cabinet War Rooms, which in itself was a treasure trove of names:

Clarita ‘Clara’

Clement

Clementine (known as Clemmie)

Hastings

Kingsley

Leonie

Magnolia

Olive

Randolph

Winston

And whilst I remember, the picture in a recent  post is not Embankment, it’s Bank. Specifically the central line station at Bank. It’s nice to have that issue cleared up.

Categories: Name Spot of the Wek | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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