Posts Tagged With: Lou

Introducing Lou

020

If you all might remember, I moved from the Midlands to the south of England last year and with every big move, I found myself having to introduce myself to a mass of new people.

I’d thought it would be of vague interest for you all if I share with a few insights I’ve had from the constant introductions which followed my big move.

For those new here (ayup!), now would be a good time to mention that whilst Lucy is my so-called ‘real’ name, I’ve gone by Lou for awhile now purely because back then I thought I was way too clumsy and much too into playing football to pull off a girly name like Lucy, so opted for the more androgynous Lou.

Curiously, whilst my obsession with football remains, I’ve definitely shifted towards a much more girly attitude in recent months, namely, insisting on wearing dresses despite the frozen conditions.

1. What Is Lou Short For?

Quite a cause for debate, since I introduced myself as Lou and neglected to mention what Lou was actually short for. This is intriguing in the fact that they automatically assumed Lou to be a nickname, plus it was fascinating to learn that the frontrunner they’d come up with amongst themselves for my ‘real’ name was Louise/Louisa. What’s more interesting for me is that Lucy apparently wasn’t even considered, despite the wild popularity of the name for the past two decades (constant Top 100 presence in England&Wales).

The mystery was eventually solved when I unwittingly wore an old exchange trip hoodie with the name Lucy emblazoned down the arm.

2. Why Do I Call Both Myself And The WC, Lou/Loo?

This one I’d never really picked up on myself doing until much recently, when a friend pointed it out to me. It certainly flies in the face of the classic ‘pick a name without negative connotations’ naming advice.

Then again, I met a lovely lady named Dimple over the summer, but most people I know think dimples are a cute facial feature rather than a negative one.

4. That Friend Who Doesn’t Use Lou

One of my closest friends I’ve met in my new area calls me Lucy these days, despite the fact that I introduced myself to him as Lou, as I did for everyone else. It’s curious, because he did initially call me Lou before suddenly switching to using Lucy at around Christmas time with no real reason.

If I’m completely honest, I’ve never really cared all that much whether people call me Lucy or Lou, preferring to let people stick to their own personal preferences because I’m way too nice for my own good sometimes. I do recognise that not everyone is like this – my pregnant friend recently uttered the classic ‘I like Madison, but don’t want to be the mother that always insists that it’s Madison not Maddie’ line when discussing names for her unborn daughter.

2. Is James A Girl’s Name?

Not so much to do with introducing myself, more to do with a bizarre misunderstanding that lead someone to believe that my name was James. You see, he’d seen me write a friend’s name down on a piece of paper, and seemingly assumed that I was writing my own name down, and not that of a friend.

You laugh it off, but it’s interesting how accepting this person was of a girl wearing the name James.

I’m still not sure what to make of it, but hey ho, I like to reckon that I’d wear the name James well, but I likely think this for all names, so I’m not really making much of a point.

Categories: Musings | Tags: , | 1 Comment

Sibset of the Week: The Deneuves

from wikipedia.org

We’re heading to France for this week’s edition, focusing on a rather renowned French actress by the name of Catherine Deneuve, born Catherine Fabienne Dorléac (she uses her mother’s maiden name professionally). Catherine is possibly best known for her role in Indochine, which won her an Academy Award in 1993.

Catherine herself is the daughter of an actor, Maurice Dorléac to be precise. She also has two siblings, sisters Sylvie and Françoise.

But it’s the names of her children which caught my eye and got me to pull together this post. She has two children, and it’s worth noting that one of them has a Russian father, whilst the other has an Italian father:

Christian Igor Christophe

Chiara Charlotte

Both children have gone on to have families of their own, with Christian having children named Igor and Lou, whilst Chiara has Milo and Anna.

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Weekend Post: Tuesday Conundrum Answers

Snapped by me at the ghost town formerly known as the Olympic Park

This post was supposed to be posted yesterday, but instead I decided to spend my time swanning around the Olympic Stadium area of the Olympic Park, because that’s just how my standard Saturday seems to go these days.

Tell you what, the set up they’ve got going for the opening ceremony of the Paralympic Games makes it look like it’s going to be a cracker, too.

Anyway, the aim of today’s post is to finally deliver you all the answers of the conundrum I sent out on Tuesday.

The Name that fell off altogether:

Lou

(ranked for girls in 2010)

The Names that changed gender:

Harper (#858, #1087) & Brook (#1665, #1788)

(both ranked higher for boys in 2010, now rank higher for girls)

Categories: Friday Conundrum, Weekend Post | Tags: , , | 3 Comments

Tuesday Conundrum: New Data, New Gender

It’s my name!

A few weeks ago now I set out a little weekend conundrum, giving you 14 names and asking you to all correctly identify which 7 ranked higher for girls, and vice versa.

These were the answers:

Ranked Higher For Boys

Ashley, Brook, Harper, Laurie, Mackenzie, Morgan & Tristyn

Ranked Higher For Girls

Beaux, Bobbi, London, Lou, Reese, Skyler & Storm

Since the release of the 2011 data, there are three names which have altered slightly; one name no longer ranks for either, whilst two others have since swapped to the other gender, care to guess which three names you think they are?

I do recommend reading through the linked post for guidance if you feel a little uncertain, as that may help narrow down the options when you take a peek at the rankings.

Categories: Friday Conundrum | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Spot of the Week: Rugrats

My younger sister has recently taken up watching Rugrats like there’s no tomorrow, and this has caused me to rethink the name Angelica after a rude-reminder of just how mean the character is.

Sad days.

That said, are you aware of the names of Tommy’s maternal grandparents? They’re Boris and Minka, and I’m developing a serious love of the name Minka in all her Eastern-European charm. The same charm new-favourite Mila has.

The name of Tommy’s paternal grandparents are even more wonderful: Beatrix and Louis, known as Trixie and Lou and the latter is the Grandpa character seen in most episodes. He remarried a lady named Louise ‘Lulu’ at the beginning of the Rugrats in Paris film. Then there is Susie’s mother, Luciell ‘Lucy’.

Clearly, there’s a lot of love for the name Lou in the Rugrats, and that rocks.

I can’t avoid the O word for long, and someone I want to talk about is a Judo gold medallist. Remember how I mentioned the name Pasha a week or two ago? The man who picked up the medal was called Lasha Shavdatuashvili and he hails from Georgia. That’s the country, not the state. Lasha is the name of a place east of the Dead Sea in the Bible.

To end, a new virtue name?

Pride the Lion

Or just a tad bit too much?

Categories: Spot of the Week | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ou

Since I was talking about a Swiss family yesterday, it seems as if we should continue our continental talk by retreating once again back to France. You see, I was scrolling through the 2010 French data on BehindTheName, when I noticed that an awful lot of names contained the letters o and u side-by-side – especially a lot of lou names (Woo!).

Here’s a complete list of the names in alphabetical order, with the majority of meanings courtesy of MeilleurPrénoms:

BOYS:

Abdoulaye (#439) – servant of God, Arabic. Abdoulaye Méïté plays for Dijon FC and Abdoulaye Wade is the former President of Senegal.

Amadou (#468) – possibly a variant of Amadeus, which means love of God in Latin. Could also be taken from the French word amadou, which means tinder or derive from Arabic and mean praiseworthy

Ayoub (#95) – repentance, Arabic

Édouard (#209) – French form of Edward, which means guardian of wealth

Elouan (#170) – possibly derives from Celtic and means light

Lou (#451) – short for Lou- names

Louca (#307) – variation of Luke, which means from Lucania

Loucas (#325) – see Louca

Louis (#5) – derives from Ludwig and means famous warrior

Louison (#321) – could mean son of Louis or simply be a petform of the name Louis/Louise

Louka (#85) – see Louca

Loukas (#449) – see Louca

Mahamadou (#459) – praiseworthy, Arabic

Mamadou (#316) – newly weaned, Arabic

Marouane (#340) – rock, quartz, Arabic

Moussa (#251) – saved from the waters, Arabic

Ousmane (#475) – young serpent/snake, Arabic

Souleymane (#370) – healthy, intact, safe, Arabic

Titouan (#59) – variant of Antoine, which means flower, Greek or invaluable, Latin

Youcef (#335) – God will save, Hebrew

Younes (#105) – close to God, Hebrew

Youssef (#145) – see Youcef

GIRLS

Anouk (#154) – grace, Hebrew

Dounia (#237) – wealth, Arabic

Fatoumata (#214) – small camel that has just been weaned, Arabic

Leelou (#381) – variant of Lilou

Lilou (#12) – derived from the character in Luc Besson’s film The Fifth Element

Lou (#25) – short form of Lou- names

Lou-Ann (#156) – combination of the name Lou and the name Ann

Lou-Anne (#167) – variant of Lou-Ann

Louane (#29) – variant of Lou-Ann

Louann (#327) – variant of Lou-Ann

Louanne (#200) – variant of Lou-Ann

Louisa (#195) – famed warrior, Germanic

Louise (#10) – variant of Louisa

Louison (#274) – see Louison above

Louna (#19) – variant of Luna, which means moon

Lylou (#105) – see Lilou

Maimouna (#403) – happy, Arabic

Marilou (#284) – smoosh of Marie and Lou

Marylou (#291) – see Marilou

Nour (#117) – variant of Noor, which means light in Arabic

Soukaina (#486) – wellness, Arabic

Soumaya (#331) – perfect, high, Arabic

Youna (#453) – if, Celtic

Yousra (#256) – who has good character, Arabic

Categories: French Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Friday Conundrum Answers

Wrong type of celebratory card, but you get the idea

We’re back, with the much-awaited answers to Friday’s fun little conundrum.

Truth be told, I was a little cheeky when it came to choosing the names to feature in the Friday conundrum, so for me it came as no surprise that the same names were consistently being wrongly identified as the other gender. However, now you shall know the truth.

The names which ranked higher for boys:

Ashley, #178 compared to #516 for girls

It’s understandable if you got this wrong, a recent Nameberry blog post did say:

at this point, do leave Ashley to the girls

Well, not us Brits, clearly. I don’t suppose anyone is watching the Euros? We have two Ashleys in our current England squad, Ashley Young and Ashley Cole. The former was born in 1985, the year Ashley ranked at #2 in the States and in 1984 the name ranked at #49 for boys in England&Wales.

Brook, #1109 compared to #1389 for girls

This is despite the fact that Brooke ranks inside the Top 100, at #45, so this one was a surprise for me. But obviously, not for some of you since a couple of you called right on this one.

Harper, #897 compared to #930 for girls

This name was a case of testing to see whether you’ve all been listening, and clearly you haven’t since everyone got this wrong. This name is also the reason I carefully worded my definition of ‘most popular’ to highest ranking, because truth be told more baby girls were named Harper in 2010, but the name ranked higher for boys. Crafty wording on my behalf? Perhaps.

Laurie, #1109 compared to #1815 for girls

Spelled Lori, this name only ranks for girls (at #2392), but this spelling is more popular for boys. I do know lads named just Laurie, my age and indeed younger.

Mackenzie, #239 compared to #1332 for girls

The interesting thing to not here is that the name is climbing for boys, and falling for girls. The alternate spelling of McKenzie ranks even higher for boys at #153.

Morgan, #106 compared to #229 for girls

My goddaughter, whom we’ve previously mentioned, was going to be named Morgan should she have been a boy. I will hand it to anyone who thought this ranked higher for girls, Morgan ranked inside the Top 100 for girls back in the early noughties – peaking at #59 in 2000, however the male ranking still eclipsed the female one at #52 in 2000. Both have clearly dropped since then, but more so on the female popularity list.

Tristyn, #3332 compared to not ranking at all for girls

I wondered whether the spelling-with-a-y would trip some up, and it looks like it did. I know, this was another mean-spirited selection and perhaps you all would’ve opted for the blue side if it had been spelled Tristan.

What it does demonstrate is that -yn isn’t necessarily a feminine ending, and indeed in Wales many male names are spelled with a y, i.e. Gwyn is a male name, Gwen is a female name.

As it so happens, another variant Trystan only ranks for lads too, and the highest ranking version of the name is Tristan at #121. Possible Top 100 aspirations? With all the variants to consider, it’s very much a possibility.

The names which ranked higher for girls:

Beaux, #2843 compared to not ranking at all for boys

Clearly, if you have a working knowledge of French grammar, your inclination would be that this name ranked higher for boys, as beaux is the masculine plural form of beau, a French word meaning beautiful. This was a slightly mean pick on my behalf, especially as late last year there was a Brit celeb-baby boy born named Beaux.

Bobbi, #1093 compared to #1801 for boys

I wondered whether those whom know that Bobby ranks at #83 for the boys would be inclined to believe this ranks more highly for a boy, but that sadly isn’t the case. I do wonder, however, whether people were swayed by Ms. Bobbi Kristina Brown, daughter of Whitney Houston, as I presume more know about her than the fact that Bobby is in the England&Wales Top 100.

London, #2392 compared to #2941 for boys

There have been two examples of celeb-babies of both genders being given the name London in recent times: in September 2011, Jay McGraw welcomed a son named London Phillip; at the end of May 2012 Brooke White welcomed daughter London Ray.

Lou, #4012 compared to not ranking at all for boys

Woo! How could I resist not including my name? This is in line with European trends for Lou as a female name.

Reese, #1180 compared to #1241 for boys

The names Rhys (#65) and Reece (#84) both rank not only higher for boys, but both are inside the Top 100. Then we have the Reese Witherspoon spelling which is slightly ahead for girls.

Skyler, #1731 compared to #2400 for boys

This is the flipside to the States, where Skyler ranks higher for boys at #287 compared to #456 for girls.

Storm, #1093 compared to #1801 for boys

No one got this right either, and I can see why, the name Storm could be seen as akin to the name Bear – which is seen almost exclusively as a boy name, amongst the emerging crop of boys names with an almost wild & rugged edge to them. But alas, this is not the case.

Categories: Friday Conundrum, Popularity | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Friday Conundrum: Unisex Names

I despair

Unisex names are on the rise, and I’ve been on the receiving end of the issue myself.

Picture the scene:

There I was, innocently helping Santa give out presents to young children, and lo and behold a child with long blonde hair stepped forward, and told Santa that their name was Sam. It was by pure chance that Sam got the right gender present because I was at a loss. Yes, Sam is technically boys name, but it’s also a popular short form of Samantha, a girls name. Then along came another girl with shoulder length brown hair and the name Jimmy. I almost threw my hands up in despair.

Thus, I challenge you to my Friday conundrum, listed below are 14 names: 7 ranked higher for the girls in 2010 in England&Wales; and vice versa for the other 7. Can you guess correctly?

1. Ashley

2. Beaux

3. Bobbi

4. Brook

5. Harper

6. Laurie

7. London

8. Lou

9. Mackenzie

10. Morgan

11. Reese

12. Skyler

13. Storm

14. Tristyn

I’ll be honest, some surprised me when researching this post, and ye who cheat make bunnies cry.

Categories: Popular Names, Popularity, Unisex Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Loulou…

from rouskadetiolles.fr

Remember how I mentioned the names of John Torode’s kids a few weeks ago in our weekly Sibset post? Well, at the time I claimed his youngest child was called Lulu – and it seems that I was half right. You see, I read an article by the man himself quite by chance a few days ago and he spelled her name Loulou. Loulou! Like Lou, but twice the fun – I’m almost jealous.

This got me thinking, as most things in my life do, about other names which have the quirky characteristic of containing mine. One of my favourite films growing up was The Jungle Book which featured a character called Baloo. Staying with films we have Leeloo from Luc Besson’s The Fifth Element – whose name went on to dominate the French popularity charts in a different guise: Lilou.

Those two examples only scratch the surface. Delving deeper we get to Blue – now famed after Beyonce and Jay-Z gave it to their daughter born in January, whilst Geri Halliwell has a daughter named Bluebell.

Moving over to names starting with Lou, let’s start with royalty. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge recently became owners of a dog named Lupo – whilst actress Hilary Duff welcomed a son named Luca only the other day.

Lupo is an interesting choice and it’s Italian for wolf. A few years ago VW manufactured a car called Lupo, with the last one rolling off the production line in 2005. Interestingly, it was replaced by a car named Fox.

As for Luca, the first critical point to make is that you can legitimately give this name to either your daughter or son – it’s not just a male-only name. Yes, Luca is the Italian and Portuguese version of Luke, but at the same time the name is also the Croatian and Hungarian version of Lucia.

Speaking of Lucia, there’s a new kid on the block with her posse of names and that is the one which started it all off – Lux. From this Latin word for light we get many names, and many offshoots of such names (my favourite, aside from Lucy, is the Welsh Lleulu). Some parents are now opting to return to using simply Lux – and I’ve seen it used on both boys and girls. A comedian by the name of Eddie Perfect recently welcomed a daughter named Lottie Lux, sister for Kitty. Back in June 2011, footballer Andrew Embley welcomed a son named Lux Edward, brother for Autumn Claire.

Both Luke and Lucas are in the Top 100 in England&Wales, but neither Lucian nor Lucius are. It’s worth noting though that the first two names mean man from Lucania, whereas the latter two mean light; aside from them, we also have Lumina which means light.

The opposite of the light is dark, and that’s my strenuous link to Luna – a name which means moon. Sometimes the French will spell this name as Louna, which is a respelling I find myself fond of.

Going back to Eastern Europe, we have Lubomír from the Czech Republic which has the wonderful meaning of peace and light. A name Lubomír always reminds me of the French Ludovic – often shortened to Ludo as Ben Fogle does with his young Ludo – which means famed warrior. From Germany we get Leuthar, or Luther, which means people’s army and this is a name which has passed into English-speaking usage. I’m sure I’m also seen a similar name along the lines of Luthos before.

Now, we’ve mentioned plenty of names beginning with Lou, but there are a few more names which contained a lou sound.

The first I want to mention is Tallulah, a rather fun in sound name and certainly less controversial than the similar name Delilah. Whilst the meaning is uncertain, there are some waterfalls in Georgia named Tallulah. There’s a similar looking Irish name – Talulla – which means princess.

Then we have Mélusine, a name from European folklore. The tale goes that Melusine was a water fairy who transformed into a serpent from the waist below every Saturday.

A male name that merits a mention is Pluto which was until recently the name of a planet; he means wealth. Then we have another popular French name to finish off the list: Elouan. He comes as the name of an obscure saint, recorded in Cornwall as being Elven or Elvan. In Cornish, elven means spark.

All that said, I still believe that the name Lou rocks more than any of these names, personal preference and all.

Categories: Name Themes/Styles | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Name Spot of the Week: Game Show Blitz

Simmy (l) and James (r), from James May's Man Lab, from tinypic.com

I found myself humming Little April Shower from Bambi earlier on today, and that got me thinking: April or Avril? Or maybe even Aprella? There were four voice actors for Bambi in his film, of which the ones for baby, young and adolescent Bambi were called Bobby, Donnie and Hardie.

I’ve rediscovered the TV channel Challenge this week, and have been busy gobbling up up the classic game show reruns. Earlier on today I caught an episode of Family Fortunes featuring a family of elderly ladies named Joan, Dorothy, Enid, Margaret and Ella. To the modern eye, Ella looks almost out-of-place, but in fairness Ella was at #97 in 1904.

Classic Who Wants To Be A Millionaire threw up an Ingram – who went on to win the top prize. He has a son called Isaac ‘Zac’, whilst the player beforehand used his friend Olaf for Phone A Friend.

Million Pound Drop also restarted up again this week – huzzah! Akbar and Lynne won 25k, whilst Craig and Seve won 100k. Seve was half-spanish and he reminds me of the man called Simmy who turned up in James May’s Man Lab series from a few weeks ago. I can only speculate that Simmy is short for Simon. Back to Million Pound Drop and there was also a pair called Jono and Liam, and another pairing called Kenneth and Whitney who went out on their first question.

I’ve also started to get into this series of Masterchef: The Professionals, whilst includes a male named Perry – and another one named Ash. Speaking of Ash, 3-letter names rock, and I’m not just saying that because Lou fits this category. I’m also saying this because I couldn’t help but notice a buzz developing around these names of late, especially over at Elea’s little corner of the internet. They’re certainly more intriguing than Ann or Rob, and the collection mentioned over the past week by my peers is nothing short of fascinating:

Roa, from Eponymia’s post on Names From Jordan.

Zed and Ovo, from Bewitching Names’ post of Names From Cirque du Soleil

Ada and Azo from Baby Names From Yesteryear’s post on Lord Byron.

Bell, Pax, Paz, Eir, Joy, Gil, Lux, Luz, Ora, Ori, Uri, Nur and Xue from British Baby Names’ Advent Calendar series.

Icy and Ivy from Midwinter Names’ post on Wintery Names.

Ava and Jem from Waltzing More Than Matilda’s post on Names From Stories on Midwives

Asa and Roy from Names 4 Real’s most recent post of Birth Annoucements.

Zeb and Zef from Appellation Mountain’s post on Z- Names for Lads.

Dot from Nook of Names post on Rune Names.

Wim and Kit from Marginamia’s post on Names from The Glow.

Categories: Name Spot of the Wek | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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