Posts Tagged With: Liv

Sibset of the Week: The Fayers

Elsa Fayer, from gossip.fr

I’m trying to make a concentrated effort to start talking more about French names, after a lapse in service of late. Yesterday we talked about Elise, and I failed to mention at the time that I’ve been reading a French play called L’Avare, in which on of the lead female characters is called Élise. The play came about in 1668. We’ve already mentioned Élise’s brother: Cléante. But we’re not going back into pre-Revolution France this week, although in a way we already have given that we’ve talked about one sibset, albeit fictional.

Elsa is another Elizabeth offshoot, and also the name of this week’s mummy, Elsa Fayer. She’s a French television presenter, working with major French networks France Television and TF1. She has three daughters, one born in 2000 with one partner and she then welcomed her youngest two, twins, with a different father in 2010:

Ambre

Emy

Liv

On the names she gave to her twins, in a interviews she said the following which I’ve rougly translated from French into English for all you non-French speakers:

I’ve had the name Emy in my mind for a long time. My partner and I could not agree about a second name for twin 2, however. After the girls were born, we were still stuck for ideas, so for three days our daughters were known only as ‘twin 1’ and ‘twin 2’. The ‘ French registry office’ pressed us so we organised a crisis meeting between my partner and my other daughter and we all fell for the name Liv.

Crisis baby naming at it’s best, whilst I wouldn’t personally opt for Liv and Emy, they make for a surprisingly pleasing minimalist pairing. Matchy in style, without going down the Tyler/Taylor route.

Categories: Sibset of the Week | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments

Weekend Post: Girlish Nicknames on Boys

Tiff Needell, from wikipedia.org

Last week we talked Boyish Nicknames on Girls, and Anna suggested that we make it a two-parter and look into Girlish Nicknames on Boys. It’s certainly a trickier subject to attack, since there are parents who will refuse point-blank to use a name once it goes to the girls on the grounds of bullying. Since I view the future as unpredictable timey-whimey, I don’t particularly view this argument as having solid grounds on which to abandon names you love.

I see nothing wrong with using slightly more feminine names for males, only the other day I was thinking about the plus sides of using Piper as a male name, and still thinks the lads can rock the name Harper. Personally, I know that if I ever were to use the name Cassius, he’d end up being referred to as Cass or Cassie. And Jenson? I’d rather use the cheery Sunny than the slightly less-upbeat spelling of Sonny.

Tiff Needell and Ruby Walsh are two sportsmen who go by less-than-masculine nicknames, but that hasn’t hurt their careers one bit. Tiff is a former racing driver who came into this world as Timothy, whilst Ruby started off life as Rupert and is a jockey.

Some say that not gender-specific names breed confusion, and I can’t argue against that. It does. I was given the book Housewife on Top last Christmas, or was the one before that? It could even have been a cheeky christmas/birthday present, come to think of it. It’s the third book in the series, so how was I to know that Helen lived in the appartement below a gay couple. Especially when they were called Paul and Sally. I spent much of the book wondering why Sally appeared to think she was a guy, and why Helen had the hots for her, and then it dawned on me that Sally was short for Salvador.

Then we have my brother, Jack – who is more often than not referred to as Jackie/Jacqui or even Jacqueline. This is because, like me, he has curly hair which grows faster than is really natural. There have been times in our childhood where his hair has been roughly the same length as mine – I kid ye not, so there must be people out there who think I have three sisters. Or a sister and two dwarfs for siblings, since the two ‘legit’ sisters are frequently referred to as Happy and Dopey.

There is some overlap between male and female nicknames. Allie can be short for both Alexander and Alison, and I wouldn’t bat an eyelid if you call little Charlotte or Charles by the name Charlie. There are times, though, when a little less vagueness in gender of the name occurs. Like Olly is more likely to be short for Oliver than Olivia, Ruby is more likely to be a female name than short for Reuben. I won’t lie, the idea of using Ruby in this capacity intrigues me. It especially works when you think that the German word for Ruby is rubin, which sounds like a cross between the names Robin and Reuben.

Speaking of our favourite O- names: Oliver and Olivia are top of the pecking order in England&Wales. Both could shorten to Olly, both could also shorten to Liv. Steve Tyler of Aerosmith has a daughter named simply Liv. In a similar vein, William could easily shorten to Lil; Daniel to Nell; Samuel to Mel. I also know of a Lenny whose name has morphed over time to Lainey.

One name that has been growing on me as of late is Beck. Normally given as a short form of Rebecca, he could easily transfer over to be associated with Becket(t), or maybe even Benedict. My sister informs me that there is a male character named Beck in the tween show Victorious.

Speaking of the box, there was a man named Jody on the news this morning. The name Jody is a legitimate short form of Joseph – although most men named Joseph seem to prefer to go through life as Joe instead.

The name Scout is emerging as a female choice, thanks to my sister’s favourite book, To Kill A Mockingbird, but he still has potential for the lads. I have a friend who suggested him as a short form of Sebastian. It’s certainly an eclectic option, but worth a look into.

Let’s end the post on a bold suggestion: Cleo, which I’ve genuinely been thinking about of late. It starts off with a French play, L’Avare, which has a male lead character called Cléante. The name is roughly said as CLAY-ohnt, so maybe say it CLAY-oh, not CLEE-oh? The name itself could possibly come from Cleanthes, which itself could come from the Greek kleos, which means glory and is also exactly where we get Clio from.

Not such a crazy idea after all.

Categories: Weekend Post | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.