Posts Tagged With: Clarence

Jubilee Fun

John Lewis Jubilee Sign

It’s a wonderful day to embrace a feeling of patriotism, so it feels apt to mark the Diamond Jubilee celebrations by looking at some patriotic choices. This is, in a sense, a re-run-come-update of a list I posted last year to mark the Royal Wedding.

This list includes inspirations from all realms of British culture, be it film, food or famed landmarks. Yes, I’m sure you can come up with names not on this list, and it would be wonderful if you flag them up in the comments for all to see.

Alba – The Scottish Gaelic name for Scotland

Albion – An alternate name for England, mostly used by the poetic.

Alfred – Sir Alfred Hitchcock pioneered many techniques in the realm of horror and suspense theatre.

Arthur – The name of one of England’s most famous folklore characters.

Audrey – Audrey Hepburn consistently ranks as one of the greatest actresses of all-time.

Aviva – One of the FTSE 100 companies listed in the London Stock Exchange, which is a well-known insurance company.

Azure – Perhaps an odd choice at first, but let us consider the second line of the patriotic song Rule Britannia, which states: arose from out the azure main [Britain].

Bell – Alexander Graham Bell was the inventor of the telephone.

Blake – The writer of the patriotic song Jerusalem (and did those feet in ancient time), was one William Blake.

Blighty – This one screams patrioticism, it is a slang name for England, often heard in Old War films.

Bournville – The village built by confectionary company Cadbury for its workers. Cadbury championed many things, such as pension schemes, joint works committees and a full staff medical service.

Brunel – Isambard Kingdom Brunel often tops the Greatest Britons lists. He was a Victorian engineer.

Calico – As in, the legendary pirate, Calico Jack.

Camber – Legendary first King of Cambria

Cambria – A classical name for Wales

Chaplin – Charlie Chaplin remains to this day one of the greatest silent film actors.

Clarence – Clarence House serves as the home of the Prince of Wales, and is another official royal residence.

Columba – St. Columba is one of the patron saints of Scotland.

Beeton – Mrs Beeton is one of the best known cookery writers.

Buckingham – Buckingham palace is the primary London residence of the Queen. Often referred to colloquially as Buck House, perhaps making the name Buck an option too.

Cambridge – The name of one of the top Universities in the world, located in England.

Cecil – Cecil Spring-Rice wrote the words to the patriotic song I Vow To Thee My Country.

Cole  – As in King Cole, he has been prominent in English legend and literature since the Middle Ages, there is also the popular children’s song, Old King Cole.

Daffodil – The national flower of Wales.

Darwin – After Charles Darwin, who put forward the idea of evolution. He appears on the £10 banknotes.

Douglas – Capital of the Isle of Man, which is located in the Irish Sea.

Eden – The lyrics of patriotic song There’ll Always Be An England calls this fair isle, Eden.

Elgar – A British composer who composed, amongst other things, Pomp and Circumstance, until recently, he appeared on £20 banknotes, these were withdrawn in 2010.

Elizabeth – A name borne by both the present Queen, and one of England’s other notable rulers. There is also Elizabeth Fry, who championed the rights of the inmates of British prisons.

Eton – Famed boy’s school, and where the traditional dessert of Eton Mess originated (it’s a mix of strawberries, meringue and cream).

Fawkes – For Guy Fawkes, the man who tried to blow up Parliament. He is respected by many, despite his intentions. A Yeoman Warder once said to me on a tour that he is the only person to enter Parliament with noble intentions, and the tools to carry it out. Bonfire Night is celebrated every 5th November in remembrance of the Gunpowder Plot.

George – St. George is the patron saint of England, and also the name of a handful of past Kings.

Glory/ Gloria – There is the patriotic song, Land of Hope and Glory. The lyrics of God Save the Queen also call her to be glorious.

Godiva – Lady Godiva, a noblelady who rode naked through the town in order for the people of it to be released from her husband’s heavy taxations.

Grenadier – There is the patriotic song, The British Grenadiers, which is also a marching song for the grenadier units of the British Military.

Harper – The Royal Coat of Arms features a harp, which symbolises N.Ireland.

Jack – The Union Jack is the flag of Great Britain, so perhaps not a completely patriotic choice for England, but it also does not scream patriosism.

Jenner – After Edward Jenner, the man who created the vaccine, and thus saved more lives than many others.

Joule – After James Joule, who helped to develop the first rule of thermodynamics.

Kedgeree – A Victorian breakfast item, created from flaked fish, rice, parsley, hard-boiled eggs, curry powder and cream.

Kiel – The Angles who settled in England back when were originally from the Bay of Kiel.

Kipper – A breakfast item in British cuisine. Also, British slang for a short sleep is kip.

Leo – Especially for the football loving of you, we have Leo, the Latin word for Lion, of which three appear on the Royal Banner, and Three Lions is also a popular football song.

Lilibet – The childhood nickname of the Queen

Lloyd – The name of a well-known high street bank, also a member of the FTSE 100.

Loegria – Another alternate name for England, not in wide usage.

London – If you want to make a statement about your love of the English, this is always a good, obvious choice. There has been a flurry of celeb-babies named London of late.

Madeira – A madeira cake is a popular sweet item in the UK.

Mercia – One of the ancient kingdoms from days gone by which was located in the midlands.

Mona – Early records record the name of the Isle of Man as Mona.

Morris – After the great traditional dance from up North – Morris Dancing.

Narcissa/Narcissus – The national flower of Wales is a daffodil, for which the Latin name is Narcissus.

Ness – As in, the legendary beast of Loch Ness

Nevis – Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in Great Britain.

Newton – The surname of Mr. Gravity, Sir Isaac Newton. He is frequently referred to as Newton in the Isles, making Newton the obvious choice if you want to honour a prominent figure in British history. He appeared on Pound Sterling banknotes of £1.

Oak – The oak tree is a symbol of England, and also appears in the song Rule Britannia.

Oxford – The name of one of the top Universities in the world, located in England.

Penda – One of the famed Kings of Mercia.

Penny – Another name for 1p, there is the popular saying I haven’t got a penny. Pre-decimalisation, 12 pennies made a shilling.

Piccalilli – The British cuisine take on Indian pickle.

Pixie – A common mythical creature from folklore.

Richard – For Dick Turpin, a famous English highwayman. I don’t advise Dick, but Richard also honours King Richard the Lionheart.

Robin – For Robin Hood, a notable figure in English legend.

Rose – The Queen’s personal flag features the letter E encircled by a ring of roses.

Runnymede – A hard name to pull off, but it is the location where the Magna Carta was first sealed, an important charter which pioneered the idea of limiting the powers of the King by law, thus protecting the priveleges of his people.

Russell – The British Museum, one of the world’s greatest museums, is located on Great Russell Street.

Saltire – The name of Scotlands national flag, which date from the 9th century, making it one of the oldest flags in current usage.

Sandringham – Sandringham Palace is a country home of the Royals, which they privately own.

Scotia – Originally a Roman name for Ireland, nowadays an old name for Scotland.

Severn – The River Severn is the longest river in Great Britain.

Smith – The most popular surname in England.

Sterling – The name of the British currency is Pound Sterling.

Syllabub – A traditional dessert in English cuisine. It’s basically cream mixed with wine.

Tate – One of the best known art galleries in the UK.

Tea – One of our best-loved beverages.

Thames – The name of the river which flows through London.

Trent – The name of a river which flows through the midlands.

Tudor – The tudor rose is the national floral emblem of England, and whilst Rose is frequently used by many, Tudor is not, and was the surname of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I and some other notable monarchs of England.

Victoire – From the lyrics of God Save the Queen, when it is sung for God to send her victorious.

Victoria – The name of the famed Queen Victoria and thusly popular cake Victoria Sponge.

Wren – One of the most acclaimed architects in history was Christopher Wren, who was English.

Wyvern – A legendary winged reptilian with a dragon’s head, two legs and a barbed tail. Frequents British coats of arms, and was notably the standard of the ancient Kingdom of Mercia.

Yeoman – An odd choice, but the Yeoman of the Guard are one of the oldest British military corps in existence today. The Yeoman Warders are the ones at the Tower of London, completely different group of retired military men and ladies.

Categories: British Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Waterloo Road

l-r teachers Chris, Helen, Grantly and Max, from revellation.co.uk

Last week we spent two days covering names from Downton Abbey, and I’m acutely aware that I still owe you all part. III of that particular series. However today,  in classic lou-style, we’re going in a completely different direction. Waterloo Road.

Those who do not live in the UK may not be familiar with the program, as it is another show of British origin and transmission. Like Downton Abbey, the name of the show is also the name of the setting – but this time the setting is a rather more modern one; a rather more chaotic one. It’s also award-winning – it won the most popular drama at the National Television Awards in 2011, and at the 2012 ceremony that title was taken from it by Downton Abbey.

Waterloo Road airs on the BBC, whilst ITV is the home of Downton Abbey, and it’s setting is a failing school in a not-so-affluent part of Greater Manchester.

Needless to say, some of the names on the show fit the surroundings. This is just a small selection of some of the names which have appeared on Waterloo Road since it’s inception in 2006.

Any name with an (*) next to it implies my belief that the name may be a nickname.

TEACHERS ET AL.

Bridget

Anglicised form of the name Brigid, means might and power.

Candice

Alternative spelling of Candace, which was once a title of the Queens of Ethiopia in ancient times.

Clarence (parent)

From the Latin title Clarensis – the dukedom of Clarence was created in the 14th century for Prince Lionel, son of King Edward III.

Eleanor

variant of Alianor, which is most likely a medieval Provençal form of Helena.

Estelle

derived from the Latin stella, which means star.

Grantly

presumeably a variation of Grant, which either derives from the Old English gránian which means to groan/murmur, or the Old French grant, meaning great, big.

Izzie*

likely to be a short form of Isabel, which is a medieval form of Elizabeth.

Janeece

an interesting take on the name Janice, which is a modern elaboration of the name Jane – she herself a feminine form of John.

Jez*

the name of a male character, could be short for James, Jared or Jeremy…or indeed, something else entirely.

Lorna

feminine form of the name Lorne, an ancient district in Scotland.

Maggie*

nickname of Margaret.

Nelson

originally an English surname, means son of Neil.

Ruby

a popular gemstone name for girls these days – Ruby was #1 in 2007 in England&Wales.

Steph*

usually a short form of Stephanie, the feminine form of Stephen – a name which means crown.

STUDENTS

Aleesha

a variant spelling of Alicia, a name that derives from Alice, who means noble. (more Aleesha)

Bex*

I know several girls named Bex, and for all of them it is a short form of the name Rebecca.

Bolton

the name of an area in Greater Manchester.

Denzil

a variation of the name Denisel, a medieval form of Dennis.

Earl

an aristocratic title, originally from the Old English eorl, meaning nobleman.

Harley (m)

derives from the Old English hara and léah, meaning hare clearing.

Jodie

a variant of either Judy or Josie.

Jonah

a Biblical name meaning dove.

Madi*

most likely a short form of either Madison or Madeline.

Marley (m)

derives from the Old English mearth meaning weasel or pine marten.

Mika (f)

in Japan, this is a feminine name meaning beautiful fragrance. Mika Newton represented Ukraine in Eurovision 2011.

Phoenix (f)

a legendary bird, this name is considered unisex.

Rhona

possibly an adaptation of Rona, the name of a Scottish island. It could also come from Rhone, Rhondda or Rhonabwy – or even a smoosh of Rhoda and Anna.

Ronan

an Irish name meaning seal.

Ros*

I know a Rosamund and a Roisin who both go by Ros.

Ruth

derived from Hebrew and means friend.

Sambuca

the name of an Italian anise-flavoured liqueur; character often went by the short form, Sam.

Trudi

the name Trudy derived as a nickname of Gertrude, a name which means spear of strength. (more Gertrude)

Categories: Names from the Box | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Calamity Cal Pt.II

Front cover of children's book, Chasing Vermeer, from puffin.co.uk

We’ve already covered the more popular names from which you can derive the nickname Cal in the previous part to this post, so now it’s time to look at the more eclectic choices. Since my ideas were getting out of hand, we’ve condensed the list down to a top five, hence why this post way delayed. But it’s here, so let’s heartily celebrate:

1. Kalani
He’s one of my favourite Hawaiian names, which isn’t their form of an English name. Kalani means the heavens coming from the Hawaiian elements:
  • ka, meaning the
  • lani, meaning heaven
If you’re on the market for some new swimwear, Oleema and Kalani Miller own a company which sells just that, named Mikoh Swimwear. They’re from Orange County, and both are female. It’s true the name Kalani has usage on both sides, but currently in England&Wales he’s pretty unused for both genders. Only 5 male Kalanis were born in 2010 and he doesn’t rank in the female data.
2. Calder
One of my favourite books is called Chasing Vermeer, and features a lad named Calder as one of the main characters alongside a girl named Petra. Outside of this, Alexander Calder is one of the most notable bearers, and he was a sculptor and likely inspiration behind the name of the character, since the book heavily features art in many senses.
The England&Wales data speaks volumes about the popularity of this name, since it doesn’t rank for either gender, and you need 3 births to rank. So there could be two 2010 baby boys at present in England&Wales with the name, but equally there might not be any.
3. Clarence

I’m not ashamed to say I like the name Clarence, and at the same time admitting he replaced Callixto here on the list at the last minute. Thanks to the recent royal wedding, most people in the world will know about Clarence House, the London residence of the Prince of Wales and his wife. Will that help his popularity? We’ll have to wait until we get the 2011 stats to be sure.
Either way, Clarence does not suffer the gender issues some of the names on this list are open to. However, he is far down on the popularity list in England&Wales nevertheless, which gives him a spot on this list. In 2010, 6 baby boys became Clarence, that equates to a ranking of #2941, putting our rather refined choice amongst the likes of D’mari and Marvellous.
The name Clarence itself could come from a variety of sources. For one, it could come from the Latin word clarus, meaning clear perhaps making it the masculine form of Clare. It also has links with the title Clarensis which was used by various member of the British Royal Family.
4. Campbell
I much prefer soup to sandwiches for a variety of reasons, and Campbell is a name almost synonymous with soup, especially since Andy Warhol painted a picture of them in 1962.
This name gains a place in this list for being an unexpected brainwave. Campbell could easily shorten to Cal, but most probably use either Cam or Belle/a as a nickname depending on whether their darling child is male or female. Which brings us nicely onto our next point.
23 lads were named Campbell in 2010 in England&Wales, and Campbell didn’t rank as a female name. You may be thinking: Great! Let’s go get our unborn son a monogrammed hat to celebrate, but hold your horses because Campbell ranked at #758 in the US in 2010 as a female name, whilst as a male name it didn’t make Top 1000. So those 358 American girls will more than outnumber the 23 British boys. I’m not saying you should stop considering Campbell right here right now, I’m saying Campbell is a name you need to watch in terms of popularity. At the same time, Campbell could be posed to become another Ashley, a bonafide female name in the States, whilst still much more popular as a male name on the other side of the pond.
5. Callahan
I’ll admit, I used to like this name quite a bit. Unfamiliar, yet familiar in other capacities, i.e. as a surname. I’m still not sure quite where I stand on the whole surnames as first names trend, but this name put me in favour of it for a short while. There weren’t enough Callahans born in 2010 for it to rank on the England&Wales data.
This name also puts me face to face with one of my all time pet peeves: Fake Irish Syndrome. You may know a few, those people down at the local who claim to be Irish, yet have never stepped foot on Emerald Isle, and the only Irish person they’re related to is a Great Aunt from yester year. But I’ll stop myself before this rant takes over the post.
Callahan comes from the Irish surname Ó Ceallacháin, meaning descendent of Ceallachán. All pretty straight forward stuff. Follow back the name Ceallachán and you get to Ceallach, which is traditionally said to mean bright-headed. Alternatively it could have links to the word ceall, meaning church or the word ceallach, meaning war.
Categories: Boy Names | Tags: , , , , | 3 Comments

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