Posts Tagged With: Chelsea

Buns

Screenshot of Danny’s Bakewell Chelsea Buns, from greatbritishchefs.com

Today I caught up with last night’s The Great British Bake Off, which featured the remaining 7 contestants baking with sweet dough.

Cue the puns about buns.

Should you be an avid baker or not, the names of some of the yummiest buns are actually worth a look.

ARUNDEL

The recipe for Lady Arundel’s manchet goes back to the 17th century and their home shire is Sussex. It was of particular popularity amongst the aristocracy of the time, but these days they’re rarely seen – with cookbooks favouring the likes of the Bath bun instead.

Now, there is a market town in Sussex called Arundel famed for it’s castle. It’s name comes from Old English and means horehound (a herb) -dell. A second theory about the origins of the name is that it could also derive from Old French and mean little swallow.

CHELSEA

Chelsea buns are one of the more famed buns available and indeed, my own mother baked a batch just last weekend. They originate from an 18th century bun house in Chelsea. The process involved in making them is remarkably similar to the even-better-known cinnamon swirl with one of the major differences being that currants are part of the mixture and chelsea buns tend to be more of a square spiral than a circular one.

Chelsea is also the name of a famed football team currently owned by Roman Abramovich and based in a borough of London. In the mid-20th century the borough of Chelsea became quite a fashionable area of London, and thus this may have inspired parents to use the name. Chelsea comes from Old English and means landing place.

CHESTER

Chester buns are from Cheshire, and are typically classic sweet yeasted buns made with condensed milk and topped with sugar.

Another place name (and one we’ve mentioned before), the town of Chester can be found in Cheshire, which is just east of North Wales. The name again derives from Old English and means fort.

COLSTON

The Colston bun was named after Sir Edward Colston and it’s traditional homeland, so to speak, is Bristol. The bun is flavoured with candied peel, spices and dried fruit.

The meaning of Colston took a little bit of effort to track down, even despite myself living not so far away from the little town of Colston Bassett. Cheese fans may know of Colston Basset, since it is one of only 6 towns with the permission to make Stilton cheese.

Now, here’s where a little local knowledge of mine comes in. The town of Colston Bassett is literally just down the road from a town named Cotgrave which was once home to a big coal mine; indeed the roads connecting the two are called Colston Gate and Colston Road.

Since the similar name Colton is known to derive from Cole, a name that means coal, then one could argue that Colston also has a meaning linked to coal, with the tun part meaning settlement/town. However, the theory comes a little unstuck by the addition of more local knowledge: the coal mine at Cotgrave was active from the 1950s, long after Colston Bassett came into being.

That said, after devising my theory I did come across a website or two which seem to believe that Colston does indeed mean coal town, so I shall rest my investigation here for the time being.

SAFFRON

These buns rock, because Swedish tradition dictates one particular day of the year for their consumption: St. Lucy’s Day (13th December). As you may well be able to guess, these buns are flavoured with saffron (as well as either cinnamon or nutmeg) and tend to also contain currants.

Back in England, we traditionally cooked these delights on Sycamore leaves, I kid ye not.

So basically, my name is an ode to the saffron bun; if that isn’t a conversation started, then I don’t know what is.

One of the most expensive spices available, and a particularly vibrant shade of yellow which gives the saffron bun it’s colour. Yes, you guessed correctly, many bakers add food colouring to their saffron buns to compensate for being too tight-fisted with the saffron.

SALLY

The Sally Lunn buns are another bun favoured over the Lady Arundel’s of yesteryear. It comes from Bath, and if you were to visit the quaint city you’d stumble across Sally Lunn’s house which, predictably, serves this delightful treats.

Whether Sally Lunn existed or not is subject to debate, although one theory goes that another lady called Solange ‘Sollie’ Luyon brought the recipe to Bath from France. There is also the theory that Sally Lunn was simply rhyming slang for bun.

Whether the bun’s namesake existed or not, the name Sally is a long ago penned nickname of Sarah, that these days is almost her own name.

 

Feeling hungry yet?

Categories: Foodie Names | Tags: , , , , , | 3 Comments

Spot of the Week: Europe

Europe is firmly becoming a huge source of inspirations for these posts, and it’s at is again – and probably next week too given next weekend is brimming with Eurovision (there’s a great post over at Ich und Die Namen on the subject) and Monaco Grand Prix Fun. This weekend? It was the Champions League final and Chelsea won for the first time.

Chelsea is a popular girls name here in the UK, at #220 in England&Wales in 2010 (she ranked at #38 in 1994), and there’s also a fabulous dude-name-blogger named Chelsea over at The Name Agender.

One of the key players in securing Chelsea’s win was Didier Drogba, but it’s not his name I want to mention; it’s that I recently came across a Didier/Dieudonne brother pairing at the bus stop.

Then we have this week’s picture, which concerns the fact that I recently discovered that one of my friend’s has named her car:

Dorris? That was unexpected. I remember that I once had a RE teacher who owned a Volvo named Florence back in the 80s, way before she hit the Top 100, but I can’t seem to recall many other named cars.

Categories: Spot of the Week | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Santa Special

Santa Train, via flickr

I’ve spent all weekend handing out presents to excitable small children, and what has to be the biggest pack of Brownies I’ve ever come across in my life. This all adds up to the need for an extra special post to give me a chance to share with you as many names as my poor mind can remember.

That said, this post does comes with the warning that, whilst I know their rough ages due for present-selecting purposes, I can only hazard a guess at the spellings of their names. This is by no means a complete list, rather, a collection of the ones I remembered, and for the sake of simplicity, yes there were many multiples of many of these names, but I’ve forgone this since I can’t give exact numbers on how frequent each names was used, but, the ones I saw time and time again?

  • Alfie
  • Ben
  • Hayden
  • Henry
  • Lucy
  • Isabella
  • Joshua
  • Ruby

Before unleashing the lists on you, it is worth noting that the children could’ve easily been introducing themselves by their nickname, not their fullname.

Babies

Alfie James Olly
Eloise Nina Polly
Evie Meggie Ruby
Isabella Maggie Susanna

1-2

Ace Cameron George Lucy
Aiden Casper Hannah Maisie
Alfie Charlie Harry Nancy
Amy Che Henry Niamh
Archie Chelsea Holly Phoebe
Baxter Debbie Isabella Sally
Bea Ebony Isla Sally
Bella Eddy Jack Sean
Ben Edward Jenny Stanley
Billy Effie Liam Teddy
Bobby Evan Lila Thisbe
Callum Evie Lola William

3-5

Abby Esther Jason Oliver
Abigail Ethan Joel Olivia
Alfie Eve Jordan Olly
Alice Ewan Joshua Oscar
Amelia Faith Kian Owen
Ben Felix Lenny Penny
Bess Fergus Leon Poppy
Betty Gabby Lily Poppy
Bruno Gabriella Lola Ralphie
Cameron George Lolly Riley (m)
Cleo Hamish Lucy Rosie
Coco Hannah Luke Samuel
Daniel Imogen Maggie Summer
Darcy Isabella Martha Summer
Eleanor Isla Molly Tammy
Elise Jack Niamh Tommy
Emily James Nora William

6-8

Alex Freddie Joshua Reuben
Archie Georgia Kai Sam
Ben Geraldine Kiefer Scarlett
Cameron Greta Leo Sophie
Charlie Hannah Lexie Stacy
Charlotte Harriet Libby Summer
Chloe Hayden Lily Teddy
Connor Isabella Lucy Theo
Delphine Jessica Margaret Thomas
Eliza Jessie Molly Verity
Elliott Jimmy Noah Victoria
Elliott Jimmy Owen Wendy
Emily Joe Perry Willa
Erin Jools Petra William
George Joseph Rebecca Zeke

9-10

Bea Jack Molly
Becky Jake Sarah
Ben Jessica Stanley
Erin Matthew Thomas
Felicia Noah William

10+

Charlotte Joel Charlotte
Emily Joshua Quinn
Emmy Matthew Rowan
Frank Melody Winnie
Hattie Niall Zach
James Noor  
Categories: Real Babies | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Name Spot of the Week: Myth and Roxx

Pikachu, from officialfusionwar.com

I’ve just taken a look over my Twitter feed, and suffice to say, I watch far more TV than I thought. For example, on Wednesday night, a football/soccer game between Crystal Palace and Man Utd went out on the TV. It was a Carling Cup quarter final, and went into extra time. Exciting stuff, but I didn’t actually start watching until I heard the news on Twitter that a man named Pikachu was playing for them. Pikachu, as in, the famed Pokemon character. Turns out the player was actually called Dikgacoi – and his middle name was Evidence – but the commentator was pronouncing his name the same as Pikachu. Speaking of virtue names in football, Urby Emanuelson is a Dutch player, with a partner named Vanity. If you’re in need of a virtue name fix, I kindly direct you to Names From The Dustbin, which has covered all sorts of barely-used names. If you’re interested in names to do with the wonder that is life, there’s a great post at the newly-named The Name Station to sort through.

Still here? Other word names spotted this week was a duo called, and I’m not kidding, Myth and Roxx on Pointless, but they are easily the best duo I’ve yet to see on Pointless even if they failed to win:

Proof.

Their ‘real’ names are Rob and Phil. Or is that Robert and Philip? Either way, fair play to them.

My big finds on the TV this week was a Ruskin, which appears in the end credits for Come Dine With Me and a hotelier in Four In A Bed called Mardi. Finally, on Deal or No Deal, there was a lovely lady who changed her name to Daphne, and an Ursula on Masterchef. The thing to note, however, is that here in the Midlands, Mardi is synoymous with our word mardy, which takes on a whole new meaning other than French for Tuesday. It’s not widely used outside the Midlands – even though I use it all the time when talking about both my sisters – but it is slightly difficult to explain, this is how it looks used in context:

  • One can be a mardy cow
  • One can be in a mardy
  • And no one would want you to have a mardy on them

The word stroppy is similar, but having a mardy has more of a whine to it that having a strop, which is more sulky. Mardies tend to not cause a scene like tantrums do.

Like most children, I grew up with Disney films and that’s probably one of the reasons no one is using Ursula as much as she could be. A point raised on Nameberry via Twitter this week was nicknames for Ursula. My suggestions were:

Ola, Sue, Lou, Lua, Lulu, Sully, Roo, Suri and Sally.

I daresay you’d be able to come up with more, though, since Twitter limited me with it’s word count.

Now, time to change the theme dramatically. Today officially marks 30 days to my birthday, and I seriously considered incorporating a countdown into my daily posts for it (yes, still young enough to get excited about it!), but in the end I decided against it as it may cause confusion with Christmas. At which point Elea jumped in and kick started her own Christmas countdown on her blog.

Speaking of Christmas, we’ve being doing a lot of carveries at work of late. No one wants three course meals anymore, they all want carveries which is great because I don’t have to carry really hot plates of food to them, they come to us for the food. Not that this helped since this week I burnt the back of my wrist at work every so slightly on a lamp, to the extent that it simply looks like an inch-length cut rather than a burn. But what this hugely traumatic experience for me has me thinking about Brûlé. BROO-lay. It may be a little too French with all the accents kicking off, much like Jérôme, and in fairness it is the French word for burnt. Speaking of French words, another list of them turned up on the newly established Name Soirée blog. French slang of the day is le boum, which means party, much like le soirée does.

New blogs are great, but what’s even better is when abandonned ones gets a rebirth. You may have noticed that I now have a blogroll dedicated to listing ‘dead’ name blogs, of which Chelsea from The Name Agender was on until he reappeared this week (huzzah!), and has already kickstarted two new discussions into names and their genders which I will at some point get a chance to comment on:

Red and Ginger: What makes one colour masculine and the other feminine?

Did Dakota Fanning kill Dakota for boys?

Another discussion point that was lightly touched upon by Anna recently, was the subject of teen baby-naming. I don’t think I got around to commenting (apologies Anna!), but I do have a nugget to say on the matter. Whilst I have no intention of growing aliens in my tummy just yet, I am a teen.

Does it upset me that my peers are naming their offspring things like Miilah and giving us all a bad name?

No. The riots did that just fine. I don’t find myself particularly snobby when it comes to so-called ‘teen baby names’, because I do still have a tendency towards cutesy – I think Sunny Papillon is one of the happiest names going, and yes, I do call dibs on it – I also realised this week that I have a soft spot for Firefly thanks to Nook mentioning it – but I’m willing to bet that not all babies named Miilah have parents younger than 20, and I don’t believe we all suddenly become super-fantastic baby namers the minute we turn 20. I know teen mothers, and I’ve seen the effort some of them have put into choosing the right name for their bundle of joy. Amira is a beautiful name, and it’s great to see people still using Kasey for their sons. At the end of the day, you can always change your name. One Gideon Osborne changed his name as a teen to become the George Osborne we know today.

Today’s final, slightly more lighthearted, note is this (yes, one more! I’m on a roll today). Like all people, there are names I really struggle to like. There is the danger of name bloggers heavily showcasing those names they love in favour of the ones they don’t. I shall take the first brave step: I don’t like Tobias. Liking Toby is a push for me – but the whole family is saved for me by Tobermory. Kristen has recently been talking about the names of the delightful stuffed toys she has recently bought – Raymond and George, which is what got me on to Tobermory. I owned a bear called Tobermory as a child, named after the character from The Wombles. Tobermory also fits in with the place name trend, as it’s the capital of the Isle of Mull in the Scottish Inner Hebrides – which you all already knew of course. For me, Tobermory feels likely a homely reminder of by bygone childhood.

Categories: Name Spot of the Wek | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Blog at WordPress.com.