Posts Tagged With: Cécile

Name Spot of the Week: La Haine

Scene from La Haine, from blogger.com

I’ve been watching a few french films of late, and there was one which really caught my attention. Yesterday I watched a film called La Haine, which is about life in the banlieu – basically the French equivalents of housing estates. In came out in the late 90s, several years before there were quite violent riots in France in 2005 – sparked by the accidental deaths of two teenagers whilst being chased by the police.

A few names from the film which stood out for me were:

Astérix (nickname)

Cassel (surname of one of the actors)

Choukri (actor)

Hubert – The t is silent when the French say this name, and for me that really makes me reconsider the name.

Mathieu (director)

Magimel (surname of one of the actors)

Médard

Rywka  (actress)

Saïd

Vincent ‘Vinz’

Other names vaguely related to the film are:

Cécile – Half sister of Vincent Cassel. He played one of the main characters.

Chanteloupe – The majority of the filming took place in an area called Chanteloupe-les-Vignes.

Deva and Léonie – The name of Vincent Cassel’s daughters. He played one of the main characters.

Makome – His death helped inspire the film.

Elsewhere, the frontman for Spandau Ballet, Gary Kemp, recently welcomed his fourth son: Rex Albert. He joins brothers Finlay Munro, Milo Wolf and Kit Frank.

 

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Du pain.

I spent a good deal of my France trip snowed-in, but that didn’t hold me back when it came to spotting some interesting tidbits and names to share. Truth be told, I actually got home last night, but opted to save this post until today.

One of the first names I want to mention is Cocatrix. In between snowstorms I managed to make it to a chateau, in which a mini-artsy area resides. One of the rooms revolves around a creature called the Cocatrix. It’s meant to be an investigation into seeing how much information one needs to throw at someone before they come to believe in an imaginary creature. It was an interesting concept, although I’m still a fan of the whole pretty-paintings style of art. As a name, it’s worthy of thought. Nameberry ran a post this week featuring Cora. In this name she is very much smooshed with another darling-of-the-moment: Beatrix.

Then we have Beyly. Before you all rush to comment on how horrified you all are to see Bailey mutilated in such a way, I ask you to consider the following information: I saw it as someone’s surname, not firstname. Speaking of differing spellings, I also came across a Jheni, a Devid and a Dorine – the latter had a sister named Clémence and both were under 6 years of age.

Moving swiftly to French names, since they’re at their most abundance in France. I managed to meet no less than 4 ladies named Mireille; a Cécile; an Alfre; a Muriel; a Nathalie; a Gilles; an Olivien and a Sandrine. Actually Alfre doesn’t really belong to this set of names since I’m thinking it could be a slight variant of Alfr, which is a name from Norse mythology and means elf. The name Alfie derives from Old English, but too shares the elf meaning. Either way, to me Alfre feels French, but that may be because I’ve spent all week speaking French, where one of the major groups of French verbs are ones ending -re (the other two being -er verbs and -ir verbs): mettre (to put/place), prendre (to take), vivre (to live), suivre (to follow) – to name just a few popular verbs oft heard. There’s an actress called Alfre Ette Woodard.

Not so much a name, but in the time there I came across the French word Pomélo – rather reminds me of Pomona and Pomeline, but it has no relations to apples, rather it’s the French word for a type of grapefruit.

A few more notable names I noticed:

  • Bafétimbi. The name of a French footballer, currently playing for Lyons and the national team.
  • Clovis. Admittedly, the name of the neighbour’s poodle.
  • Edda. The name of a small child’s doll from a supermarket trip.
  • Hannelore. Tween/Teen-aged girl – referred to as Laure.
  • Ludovic. Nicknamed Ludo.
  • Maberly. The name of a lady who served me in a shop.
  • Melhi. Bus driver.
  • Sidse. A half-German female.
  • Thekla. A toddler.
  • Timandra. The name of a lady in the editorial credits for a magazine I read in France. The title of said magazine eludes me.
  • Vicco. 30-something male.
  • Widget. Author of an article I read whilst in France, this was the name given but I could see the argument of it being a nickname.
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Name Spot of the Week: Exam Names

Exan season is upon me, and now that I’m A-Level, my science exams lack the names that made the Science SAT paper so much more interesting. Nowadays, I have to live with ‘student’, but luckily I take French&Psychology, who do use names, albeit French more than Psychology.

My year was the last to take the Year 9 Sats tests, which contained names such as Tracy, Brian and Ranjit. Yes, Ranjit. Either him or brother Sanjit always made an appearence, in an effort to stay PC, more than anything. It certainly added some humour to the proceedings.

Some other notable names from past papers:

Abdel. Past French Paper.

Adama. Past French Paper.

Angus. Past Psychology Paper.

Bénédicte. Past French Paper.

Bérengere. Past French Paper. There should be a grave accent on the 3rd e, but alas, my keyboard is not French. Bit of trivia for you: English keyboards have qwerty, for the French, it’s azerty.

Bernard. Past French Paper.

Cécile. Past French Paper.

Maika. Past French Paper.

Nina. Past French Paper.

Thibault. It’s a scandal I forgot to include this delightful French names on my recent -o names that aren’t really -o names list, and for those not in the know, it’s tee-bo.

Vandita&Sandra. These two appeared in the same question in a past psychology paper, the mind boggles.

Xavier. I’ve seen him crop up at least twice on past French Edexcel AS-Level exams. (Quick note about English schooling: Edexcel is the name of the exam board, AS is the first year of A-Level, A2 is the second year)

Emma Bunton welcomed a second son this week, fashionably named Tate joins brother Beau. But the best part of the story is the name of the father: Jade.

Speaking of celebrity births, Bryan Adams is now a father to a little girl: Mirabella Bunny. A town near me is named Bunny.

I’m eagerly awaiting the next series of Outnumbered, and the names of two of the child actors are notable: Tyger and Ramona. I thought 15-year-old Tyger had it harsh until I  discovered Tyger is his second middle name, his first name is actually Lindzi. Things must be complicated at the Drew-Honey household, as his mother is called Linzi, and his father is called Simon Lindsay.

I read an interesting article the other day about a gay couple in Arizona who’ve adopted 12 children, my heart leaped when I saw one of their sons is named Ambrose.

I recently discovered the first name of a teacher of mine: Archana, it’s a Sanskrit name, meaning honouring, praising. This is the name of a Hindu ritual.

My father has a friend at t’ Masons called Teg, and it was during the setting up of Ladies Night that I discovered Teg to be a nickname for Tegfan, given his surname, Davies, I’m assuming it’s of Welsh origins.

And the final name spots this week come courtesy of a book by Chris d’Lacey, The Fire Within, he has a talent for naming dragons:

  • Gawain
  • Guinevere
  • Gwendolen
  • Gadzooks
  • Grace
  • Gruffen

I want to give a child the middle name Gadzooks, infact, I now have dibs on Gadzooks and Gawain (or rather, Gwaine); my sister and I have been name dibbing for the past few days, and I’m rather satisfied with my haul, which includes Rupert and Rosalinde, but unfortunately, I’ve had to let go of Josephine. Tis’ all in good spirits though, so I may still get her.

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