Posts Tagged With: Annabel

5 Names With Potential To Join The Top 100

The 2013 data for England&Wales is due out on the 15th August, thus, I’ve been looking at the potential contenders for the Top 100. All these names are lurking just behind the 100 mark and most have experienced rapid rises in popularity in recent years, and we”l find out on Friday whether any have made it into the Top 100.

1. Seren

She has consistently ranking in the solo Welsh Top 100 for many years now (at #7 in 2012), and on the joint list she’s at #104 (rising from #127 in 2011). That means she could continue right into the Top 100 for the joint England&Wales list, for which she’ll be a most welcome addition. Seren means star in Welsh.

2. Olly

As Oliver has been a Top 10 mainstay for awhile now it seems only logical that the nation who loves nicknames would eventually come to use Olly in the masses. He’s been rapidly rising for the past 5 years and ranked at #122 in 2011, then #106 in 2012.

3. Alexis, g

For the past two years, Alexis has ranked at #101, meaning that she has just missed out for two years running now. All it takes is one last spur and she’ll finally crack the Top 100. The name Alexis is of Greek origins and means defender.

4. Ronnie

First derived as a nickname for the out-of-fashion Ronald (still, despite the Harry Potter exposure), the name Ronnie in the UK appears to be shaking off the Kray twins association (Ronnie and Reggie Kray were criminal gangsters in the East of London in the 1950s/1960s). He rose from #142 to #105 between 2011 and 2012.

5. Lottie

She jumped from #138 to #112 between 2011 and 2012. Lottie is a short form of Charlotte (#20), who is slowly slipping down the rankings (down from #5 in 2000), and she fits with the nickname-love trend that’s been ongoing for several years now.

 

Aside form the above five names, other names to watch for are Darcy / Darcie (#107/#122, respectively. Sister Darcey joined the Top 100 last year), Iris (#122), Annabel (#109), Albert (#109, I would be thrilled if this hits the Top 100), Jasper (#129),  and Felix (#114).

Categories: Popular Names | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Alternative Long Forms for Abby

Sabine Schmitz, from richardf1.com

I had originally planned to publish an Alternative Long Forms for Lou post for today, as a part of tomorrows Birthday celebrations. I decided against it following Abby’s post on Getting to Lulu earlier on this month. So, we’re turning the tables to instead look at ways to get to Abby, because you can never have too many 🙂

Alberta/Albertine

Every year I receive a Christma card from family friends Pat and Albert – and I’ve heard a rumour that my Grandad has an Uncle Albert. Rumour? Yes, my Grandad rarely speaks about his family but if I do remember correctly it seems everyone used to call him Bob.

Is the name Alberta hopelessly out-of-fashion? Most would say yes, but some are charmed by this quality. The name does possess a rather lovely meaning, however. It comes from the Germanic name Adalbert, composed of two Germanic elements:

  • adal, meaning noble
  • beraht, meaning bright

Annabel et al

The name Annabelle entered the England&Wales Top 100 for 2010, which at the time I speculated to myself about whether that had anything to do with the recently rebooted St. Trinians film series.

The name Annabel is a variant of Amabel, which means lovable in Latin. It’s from these sources that we also get the name Mabel, which could also lead nicely to the nickname Abby.

Christabel

One part Christina, one part Annabel. Infact, the name is actually just a slight variant of the name Christina. It’s not a new coinage, however, as way back  in 1800 Samuel Coleridge published a poem entitled Christabel.

Isabeau

An old variation of Isabel which has fallen mostly out of use of late. One could suppose that Isabella et al also apply here, and either way both are simply international forms of the name Elizabeth, which means my God is my oath.

Mirabelle

Comes from the Latin word mirabilis, which means wonderful. It is also the French word for plum.

Sabine

You may or may not be aware of Sabine Schmidz, a German motor racing driver. She’s been accredited with the title of Queen of the Nurburgring – which is a motor racing track in Germany and now co-presents the German car show D Motor.

Sabine is the French and German form of the name Sabina. In days gone by, the Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy until their land was taken over by the Romans following years of conflict. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups.

Sabrina

Most will link this name to the original Welsh name of the River Severn: Habren. It was also the name of the Princess who was drowned in the Severn, and thus supposedly the river is named in her honour – but it is much more likely that her name came from the river, not the other way around.

Tabitha

We started on a name which suffers from being too associated with the elder generation, and we finish with a name that is beginning to shake off those associations. The name Tabitha was chosen by Sarah Jessica Parker for the name of one of her twin girls – the other being named Marion Loretta. The name Tabitha means gazelle in Aramaic- not so clunky looking now is it!

Categories: Nicknames | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

When Penelope Gets Popular

Paloma Faith may inspire you, from metro.co.uk

When I originally penned the Clementine post, I never imagined doing a sequel post or even turning it into a series, but the fact of the matter is that the name Penelope is getting popular, and I’ve started to wonder about what alternatives are out there. This post started off as me pondering about what other names I could get Penny from (the final three being Typhena, Peony and Euphemia), but the original draft of such a post seemed like more should be said. An elaboration was in order, and a sequel was born. So, what other names could we use when Penelope gets too popular for our liking? Just to illustrate the fact that she has grown in popularity, here’s how she’s fared in the past few years:

2003 2004 2005 2006
Rank 583 565 562 678
Births 50 55 59 46
2007 2008 2009 2010
Rank 515 427 328 272
Births 72 99 135 181

A ranking of #272 is something to take note of, since she’s shot up from #678 in 2006 to where she is today. To start off with, it seems best to first approach this topic by asking what exactly are the kinds of names people are pairing the name Penelope with, either as sibling or middle names? A trip to the London Telegraph Birth Announcements was in order to find just that out, and it was an eclectic bunch of names to say the least; here is a cut-down version:

  • Annabel
  • Aurelia
  • Bróna
  • Clementine
  • Esther
  • Evelyn
  • Dorothea
  • Felicity
  • Florence
  • Georgina
  • Harriet
  • Hettie
  • Horatia
  • Jemima
  • Lucinda
  • Marissa
  • Muriel
  • Nancy
  • Orla
  • Scarlett
  • Serena
  • Willa

The names Clementine and Florence came up severeal times, whilst Lucinda also came up at least twice. There are some conflicting styles in the names, from the seldom heard Horatia, to the very Irish name Bróna. Since Florence is a clear favourite, it seems apt to kick off a list of suggestions with the younger Nightingale sister’s name: Parthenope. Like her sister before her, Parthenope was named after an Italian city, and like Penelope, she’s four-syllables. If long names are your preference, another four-syllable P name is Philomena, which shares Penelope’s Greek roots. Dorothea from the above list also shares this trait. Other four-syllable Greek names include:

  • Angeliki
  • Calliope
  • Cassiopeia (technically five-syllables)
  • Elisavet
  • Eugenia (modern Greek form: Evgenia)
  • Konstantina
  • Louiza
  • Ophelia
  • Paraskeve (Pah-rah-ske-vee)
  • Persephone
  • Theodora
  • Timothea
  • Zenovia/Zenobia

But you may have no Greek heritage, which means the above list may means nothing at all to you. Fear not, for there are other, more English-based, options out there. The current leader of the pack for me is Peony. She’s floral, like Lily, and could also shorten to Penny if your heart so desires. I’m astonisahed that only 9 of them were born in England&Wales in 2010, because she is such a pretty name. I first came upon her, myself, when reading a book which I can’t for the life of me remember. But what I can remember was that Peony wore trousers with different coloured legs. She was an eccentric child, to say the least. Another seldom used name in England&Wales in Tolulope, given to just 4 girls in 2010, whilst Temitope was given to 10 girls.

Another P name that I reckon will be rising fast here in the UK in the next few years is Paloma. We’ve already had pop act Florence&The Machine attributed to the rise of Florence, and there’s another similar artist in the UK right now called Paloma Faith. She was the goth girl, Andrea, in the first of the rebooted St.Trinians films, but has since embraced colour to the max. Her name is Spanish for dove. Another British pop act, Mika, has three sisters named Yasmina, Paloma and Zuleika.

Going back to 2000, Penelope was given to 35 girls that year, as was Henrietta. Other names ranking similarly to her, and also containing four syllables (within 45-25 births) in 2000, with their 2010 ranking/birth number in brackets after are:

  • Angelica (#531, 75 births)
  • Henrietta (#730, 50 births)
  • Ophelia (#559, 71 births)
  • Valentina (#521, 77 births)
  • Veronica (#452, 92 births)

As you can see, non of them have broken the Top 300 as Penelope has done, but they have all risen since 2000 and could rise further but maybe not as quickly as dear Penny. That leads us onto another point, one could simply use a nickname of Penelope instead. Aside from Poppy, which resides firmly in the Top 100, the nicknames are generally not as popular as their long form:

  • Nell – #390
  • Nelly – #747
  • Penny – #396
  • Petal – #3156
  • Piper – #719
  • Polly – #300
  • Posy – #4688

I would also suggest Pippa as a nickname for Penelope, but she’s also on the express train to popularity at the moment. I guess one could argue that Philippa is another great alternative choice, who has actually been going backwards in the past few years. Other vintage-sounding P names include Patience, Prudence and Pearl, and Pomeline is a name with Royal heritage.

To conclude, Penelope is a great name with some great alternatives should her popularity put you off. My line on popularity is the same as always, though: if your heart says go for it, just go for it regardless of how popular the name may be.

Categories: Girl Names, Nicknames | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

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